Category Archives: youth

Colleges need to discipline youth, which try to stop those on the right from talking 

A conservative group on Friday threatened to take legal action against UC Berkeley if student sponsors are not allowed to pick the date and location for an appearance by commentator Ann Coulter.
Coulter had been scheduled to speak on the demonstration-weary campus on April 27, but Berkeley officials refused permission, citing safety concerns. Amid public criticism, the administration on Thursday agreed to set the event for May 2, at midday, in a science hall away from the central campus.

( Billy’s thoughts – I for one am tired of colleges not taking action against those who try to keep folks on the right from giving talks. Some college kids need discipline. Discipline is a good thing, if you are two years old, or 19 years old. Read the rest of the above story here. )

LGBTQ, transgender issues should be taught in nursery school, UK teachers’ union says

The story is here. By the way if you live in the UK, you might want to give hard thinking to removing your children from the government schools, along with the public nursery schools.

    The rest of us should do what we can to reach young people with the truth, or support those who do. Thank God for Christian ministries that are touching young people with the good news, such as CEF, and Youth for Christ.

bill that would strip parents of rights ,fails ( believe it, or not it happen in a state out in left field, CO.)

Here is the story.

Thinking of this little girl who just lost her daddy 

FGM needs to stop ASAP,and where are the women right’s groups (it is sick )

Video

Kansas gives parents more control over their children’s healthcare ( good for them ) 

Kansas is taking steps to give parents more control over medical decisions about life-extending care for their disabled or critically ill children with a new law that supporters hope becomes a model for other states.
Republican Gov. Sam Brownback signed a bill Friday that will prevent hospitals and physicians from instituting do-not-resuscitate orders or similar directives for children if one parent objects. The new law takes effect July 1.

( Read the rest of this story. )

After death of leader,school community mobilizes 

Read the story.

A Good Friday spanking ( Bible thought for kids ) 

Folks every so often I have decided I am going to post a Bible commentary that is mainly for children, and or young people. I thought Good Friday would be a good day to start doing that. I hope if you are a parent, or have young people in your life you will share these thoughts with them.Even us adults may learn from these thoughts. So don’t skip them, because you are not young, or don’t have young lads around you.Below is today’s Bible thought for kids.
( Listen to the Bible thought here, or read it below. )

   Hi boys, and girls: You may think Good Friday has nothing to do with you.

I’m Uncle Billy with a thought on the Bible.

Guess what Good Friday is for everyone adults, children, and teens.

     What happened on Good Friday? We will get to that in a second.

          When I was kid there was a Disney movie called Tom Swayer. If you have never seen it ask your parents about it, or ask their permission to get the DVD, or watch it on You Tube.

    In part of the movie the kid Tom, and a girl named Becky Thatcher are writing notes on their slates to each other,while the teacher’s back is turned. 

      Then Becky drops her slate. The teacher turns around,and demands to know who the slate belong to. Tom jumps up and says it is his slate.

    The teacher tells Tommy to go to the front of the room. The teacher then takes a switch, which is a whip,and spanks Tom good.

   What Tom Swayer did makes me think of what Jesus did by going to the cross for us. Jesus was sinless. Yet he took your punishment, and my punishment. We deserved to be punished because all of us are sinners. We deserve to go to hell, which is where our sins are sending us. Yet God loved us so much that he had Jesus go to the cross. Because a Holy God demands punishment for sin. Boys, and girls when you do something wrong your parents might give you some kind of punishment.Just like your parents have rules, God has rules on how to go to heaven. 

   Romans 5:8 tells us that the Lord loved us so much that Christ died for us while we were yet sinners.

   If you have never turned away from sin, and trusted in what Jesus did for you, I encourage you to do that. Going to church, or doing a lot of good works won’t get you into heaven, or make you right with God. It is changing your mind about sin, and trusting in what Jesus did for you.

Jesus not only died for our sins, but God the father proved Jesus was God, by raising his son from the dead. Which we will celebrate this Sunday. A day most folks call Easter. I prefer to call it resurrection Sunday. 

That is a thought on the Bible.

Until next time,

I’m Uncle Billy 
All Rights Reserved, 2017

This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.

Thanking a teacher ( we should all do it ) 

So have you ever thanked one of your teachers? Here is a column by somebody who did thank one. 

Your life is valued, no matter what you can, or can not do:

( Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. )

What’s the most dangerous thing you can say to someone in our society? “You’re useless!”
Amy Julia Becker is a successful author and columnist. She also is the mom of a beautiful daughter, a fifth-grader who wears glasses, who loves reading and spelling, but who isn’t so sure about fractions and dogs. “She is responsible, smart, talented, and loving,” Amy wrote recently in Christianity Today. “She also has Down syndrome.”
When discussing her daughter or others with Down syndrome, Amy says she is tempted to list their accomplishments and abilities as a way to justify their existence. Not any more. “In so doing,” Amy admits, “I play into the idea that I, too, am only worthy of life because I contribute something productive in the world. I devalue myself and everyone else around me when I start to see human beings as products to be measured.”
As our friend Chuck Colson warned, measuring people by what they can do or contribute to society is dangerous. If someone can be called “useless,” such as a child with Down syndrome, what’s to keep “society” from deciding to eliminate anyone deemed not to have a life worth living? This isn’t alarmism, folks.
Amy says that the abortion rate in the United States for babies with Down syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is about 50 percent and is likely to increase as prenatal testing becomes more available. As bad as that is, in Iceland, not one child with Down syndrome was born between 2008 and 2012. In Denmark, an estimated 98 percent of those diagnosed with Down syndrome are being aborted—deemed useless.
But as anyone who’s actually been around people with Down syndrome knows, they’re definitely not useless. They have individual personalities, likes and dislikes, and often possess a level of joie de vivre that puts the rest of us to shame. But that’s not the point! The point is this: Every human being is created in God’s image and is precious to Him! As Chuck said it so well, “Being created in the imago Dei endows every person with dignity—a dignity that is not derived from the majority’s opinion (or a government definition) about the quality of their life or their contribution to society.”
Amy Julia Becker notes that not everything worth keeping can be measured in utilitarian terms and pass a strict cost-benefit analysis. She quotes the Irish poet Michael Longley, who said on National Public Radio, “Poetry is useless,” before adding, “Poetry is without use, but it is valuable.” Imagine a world without poetry! Although maybe only one in a million poets can make a living from it, we’d all be immeasurably poorer without it. There’d be no Shakespeare, Milton, or the book of Psalms! You cannot put a utilitarian price tag on poetry—nor on people, whatever challenges they face.
However, when we value each person as made in the image of God and make room in our hearts for those with disabilities, we often experience a beautiful poetry unfolding in our own lives we never could have expected. Amy writes, “People with disabilities are indeed like the words of a poem. Although they might not provide or produce clothing or shelter or food, they nonetheless convey beauty and meaning, truth and transcendence. They teach us what it means to be human.”
And let’s face it—caring for those who need us is more than a nice thing for the Church to do. It’s a requirement. As our Lord Jesus said in Matthew 25, those who tend to the hungry, the naked, the stranger, the sick and imprisoned do it unto Him—in whose eyes and love no one, no one, is useless.
Now as you know, Easter is almost upon us. And to help you prepare, my colleagues at the Colson Center have created a beautiful, free downloadable booklet of meditations on the seven last sayings of Jesus from the cross. Please, come to BreakPoint.org and click on “Resources” to download your free copy.