Category Archives: doctrine

Never too late

Listen to a good news story.

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Is it ever ok to Scream at God

Listen to a radio sermon

Are Jehovah’s Witnesses followers of Christ

Listen to a commentary.

They give us hope and the winner ( s ) is

The world needs hope. Which is why I’m glad WORLD Magazine has announced the winner of its Hope Awards!

During the summer, I told you about the finalists for WORLD Magazine’s Hope Awards for Effective Compassion—Christian organizations that make a positive difference in their communities without receiving government funds. We now have a winner, so let’s end the suspense—the envelope, please! And the winner is … all of us!

Well, actually, after tallying the record number of votes from readers, WORLD selected Delta Streets Academy in Greenwood, Mississippi. DSA, which began just five years ago, has 55 students, all black and all male, in grades 7 through 11. The school aims “to equip the young men who walk through our doors daily with the gospel of Christ, and the skills needed to live a life that honors God.”

In 2008, Thomas McMillin Howard, 32, known as T. Mac, moved to the Mississippi Delta and taught math at the local public high school. T Mac found the students floundering academically. A third were dropping out; the ones who remained treated their school responsibilities as a joke. Eventually, he decided the at-risk young men needed a disciplined approach grounded in the Christian faith. So in 2012, T Mac left the public school and opened Delta Streets Academy, which began as an after-school and summer program for young men from at-risk neighborhoods.

The discipline is obvious. According to WORLD, “[Students] must tuck in their shirts, complete homework, and act respectfully toward adults and each other. They have a mandatory study hall period during the day and access to tutors after hours. And DSA is reluctantly willing to lose students who refuse discipline.”

The Christian element is more subtle, but no less real. DSA, which for now is housed in the downtown First Baptist Church, seeks to “weave the Gospel of Jesus Christ into all areas of the school believing that glorifying God and enjoying Him forever is the foundation upon which all else is built.” Imagine that.

A minister from another Greenwood church tells The Christian Science Monitor that T Mac wants white churches and civic groups to help heal the community’s racial tensions “in a society still recovering from segregation…. He’s a window into a world that many [white] Christians in Greenwood didn’t know existed.”

Says Marvin Olasky, the editor-in-chief of the WORLD News Group, “I’ve visited DSA twice and been hugely impressed by the way this Christian school educates African-American young men intellectually and spiritually. It’s our 100th national or regional winner over the past 12 years, so Christian compassion is alive and well.”

And that is just the tip of the compassion iceberg, according to journalist Warren Cole Smith. “Those of us involved in ministry or in our local churches know that if the great work of Christian ministries and local churches went away, there would be a giant sucking sound in civil society,” Warren says. “However, most churches and Christian ministries do their work quietly, with little fanfare, so—according to a Pew study—many Americans don’t understand that . . . Christians are more generous with both time and money than their secular neighbors, and that without this generosity, America would be in deep trouble.”

But not if the other Hope Awards regional winners—and countless other organizations offering compassionate ministry—have anything to say about it. These are Navajo Ministries in New Mexico, Hope Pregnancy Ministries in Montana, Village of Hope in Zambia, and New Life Home in New Hampshire.

 

In their great book, Restoring All Things, my friends Warren Cole Smith and John Stonestreet ask a great question: “What is good in our culture that we can promote, protect, and celebrate?” It’s safe to say that WORLD’s Hope Awards are a small but significant answer—and we are all winners because of them

How the mormons view Jesus compared to what the Bible teaches

Listen to a doctrine commentary.

Condemning another ( a thought on the Bible )

Listen to a  thought on the Bible by clicking here or read it below.

Hi friends: Should we condemn people. I’m Billy David Dickson with a thought on the Bible.
I believe most of us if not all of us would agree we should not condemn others. Sadly some are condemning someone in a high position.
I want to have a discussion with those of you who have been putting President Trump down as a person. It doesn’t matter if you voted for him, or not. It doesn’t even matter what political party you embrace.
In the Bible in John 3:17 it says Jesus didn’t enter the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.
My friend Cal Thomas did an awesome radio commentary awhile back.Here is what Cal said.” I am a newspaper columnist and a commentator. I am also – first and foremost – a follower of Jesus of Nazareth. The two are not contradictory.”
“As a columnist I comment on public policies and private morals. As a follower of Jesus I try not to condemn people. The difference can be a fine line at times and I admit I don’t always get it right, but I try.”
“Some fellow believers are urging me to condemn President Trump. I can criticize policies and language I may not like, but I refuse to condemn him. I am praying for him that God will make of him what God wants. All power and authority belong to the Father and he puts people in power for His purposes – from Saul, to Clinton, Obama, Bush and Trump. Anyone disagree? If not, pray for the President.”
Amen Cal. I recall when Bill Clinton was in the White House I had a shirt which read Jesus Christ loves Bill Clinton, and you too. ( Romans 5:8. ) It is one thing to disagree with policy. Which we can do, but we should not condemn President Trump, or any other leader, or anyone for that matter. If we are condemning President Trump, we might trying praying for him instead.
That is a thought on the Bible.
Until next time,
I’m Billy David Dickson

All Rights Reserved, 2017
This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.

Happy Labor Day from the late Chuck Colson

Happy Labor Day! As you enjoy your day off from work, let’s hear what Chuck Colson had to think about the dignity of work.

Eric Metaxas: Do we work to live, or live to work? I’d imagine that most of us would say we work to live: to pay the bills and support ourselves and our families. Many of us would admit that we work for the weekend—so we can do the things we really like to do, like take vacations, enjoy our hobbies and spend time with friends and family.

But I can almost hear Chuck Colson saying, “Hold on a minute, work is a gift from God.”

For Chuck Colson work was as much a part of life as breathing. From the Marine Corps to his law practice, from Capitol Hill to the Nixon White House, and especially ministering in the prisons and teaching Christian worldview, Chuck was a tireless, passionate worker for God and the causes he believed in so deeply.

In fact, although he was a few decades older than most of us on his staff, there were times we simply couldn’t keep up. This was a man, after all, who would show up at the office after the weekend and say, “Thank God it’s Monday!” And long after many men his age had retired, Chuck vowed he would work til the day he died. And for all intents and purposes, that’s exactly what he did.

So this Labor Day, I thought it would be good to hear from Chuck on his view of work itself. Here he is now, from a BreakPoint commentary called “Working Class Heroes,” which aired back in 2002.

Chuck: I for one am happy to join the celebration of working-class heroes, especially today. Christians have a special reason to celebrate Labor Day, which honors the fundamental dignity of workers, for we worship a God Who labored to make the world, and Who created human beings in His image to be workers. When God made Adam and Eve, He gave them work to do: cultivating and caring for the earth.

In the ancient world, the Greeks and Romans looked upon manual work as a curse, something for lower classes and slaves. But Christianity changed all that. Christians viewed work as a high calling, a calling to be co-workers with God in unfolding the rich potential of His creation.

This high view of work can be traced throughout the history of the Church. In the Middle Ages, the guild movement grew out of the Church. It set standards for good workmanship and encouraged members to take satisfaction in the results of their labor. The guilds became the forerunner of the modern labor movement.

Later, during the Reformation, Martin Luther preached that all work should be done to the glory of God. Whether ministering the gospel or scrubbing floors, any honest work is pleasing to the Lord. And out of this conviction grew the Protestant work ethic.

Christians were also active on behalf of workers in the early days of the industrial revolution, when factories were “dark satanic mills,” to borrow a phrase from Sir William Blake. Work in factories and coal mines in those days was hard and dangerous. Children were practically slaves, sometimes even chained to the machines.

Then John Wesley came preaching and teaching the gospel throughout England. He came not to the upper classes, but to the laboring classes—to men whose faces were black with coal dust and women whose dresses were patched and faded.

John Wesley preached to them, and in the process, he pricked the conscience of the whole nation.

Two of Wesley’s disciples, William Wilberforce and Lord Shaftesbury, were inspired to work for legislation that would clean up abuses in the workplace. At their urging, the British parliament passed child-labor laws, safety laws, and minimum-wage laws.

Here in America we’ve lost the Christian connection with the labor movement. But in many countries that tradition still remains.

But this Labor Day, remember that all labor derives its true dignity as a reflection of the Creator. And that whatever we do, in word or deed, we should do all to the glory of God.

Eric: It’s always great to hear from Chuck. Now before I leave you today I want to ask you to please pray for the residents of Houston. And do what you can to support Christian organizations like Samaritan’s Purse that are providing aid and relief.

Cal Thomas won’t condemn President Trump even though some are trying to get him to ( he is right )

SOME FELLOW BELIEVERS ARE URGING ME TO CONDEMN PRESIDENT TRUMP. I CAN CRITICIZE POLICIES AND LANGUAGE I MAY NOT LIKE, BUT I REFUSE TO CONDEMN HIM. I AM PRAYING FOR HIM THAT GOD WILL MAKE OF HIM WHAT GOD WANTS. ALL POWER AND AUTHORITY BELONG TO THE FATHER AND HE PUTS PEOPLE IN POWER FOR HIS PURPOSES – FROM SAUL, TO CLINTON, OBAMA, BUSH AND TRUMP. ANYONE DISAGREE? IF NOT, PRAY FOR THE PRESIDENT. I’M CAL THOMAS IN WASHINGTON.

( Billy’s thoughts – Right on brother Cal. Read the rest of this commentary right here or listen to the audio.)

Alim, formerly an assassin for Saddam Hussein is now a follower of Christ

Read this praise report.

The key is not what somebody did 40 years ago, but who is he today

A CATHOLIC PRIEST IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA HAS TEMPORARIY SUSPENDED HIMSELF FROM HIS POST AT A LOCAL CHURCH. WHY? BECAUSE 40 YEARS AGO WHILE A STUDENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, HE JOINED THE KKK AND BURNED A CROSS ON SOMEONE’S LAWN. FOR THAT HE SERVED JAIL TIME AND WAS FINED $20,000. BUT THEN, AS THE WASHINGTON POSTED NOTED, “GOD CHANGED HIS HEART.”

I RECALL JERRY FALWELL, SENIOR SPEAKING AT A BLACK BAPTIST CHURCH IN BALTIMORE ABOUT HIS UPBRINGING AS A SEGREGATIONIST, BUT THEN HIS LATER CONVERSION AND CONVICTION THAT RACISM WAS A SIN. THE PASTOR RESPONDED: “I’M NOT SO MUCH INTERESTED IN WHERE A MAN WAS 40 YEARS AGO, AS WHERE HE IS TODAY.”
( Billy’s thoughts – The above is a spot on commentary by Cal Thomas. To read the whole commentary click here or listen to the audio.)