Category Archives: media

Gravedigger who died on the job was considered part of Jewish community even though he wasn’t

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Man who made a difference in those in need, retires from his job

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They give us hope and the winner ( s ) is

The world needs hope. Which is why I’m glad WORLD Magazine has announced the winner of its Hope Awards!

During the summer, I told you about the finalists for WORLD Magazine’s Hope Awards for Effective Compassion—Christian organizations that make a positive difference in their communities without receiving government funds. We now have a winner, so let’s end the suspense—the envelope, please! And the winner is … all of us!

Well, actually, after tallying the record number of votes from readers, WORLD selected Delta Streets Academy in Greenwood, Mississippi. DSA, which began just five years ago, has 55 students, all black and all male, in grades 7 through 11. The school aims “to equip the young men who walk through our doors daily with the gospel of Christ, and the skills needed to live a life that honors God.”

In 2008, Thomas McMillin Howard, 32, known as T. Mac, moved to the Mississippi Delta and taught math at the local public high school. T Mac found the students floundering academically. A third were dropping out; the ones who remained treated their school responsibilities as a joke. Eventually, he decided the at-risk young men needed a disciplined approach grounded in the Christian faith. So in 2012, T Mac left the public school and opened Delta Streets Academy, which began as an after-school and summer program for young men from at-risk neighborhoods.

The discipline is obvious. According to WORLD, “[Students] must tuck in their shirts, complete homework, and act respectfully toward adults and each other. They have a mandatory study hall period during the day and access to tutors after hours. And DSA is reluctantly willing to lose students who refuse discipline.”

The Christian element is more subtle, but no less real. DSA, which for now is housed in the downtown First Baptist Church, seeks to “weave the Gospel of Jesus Christ into all areas of the school believing that glorifying God and enjoying Him forever is the foundation upon which all else is built.” Imagine that.

A minister from another Greenwood church tells The Christian Science Monitor that T Mac wants white churches and civic groups to help heal the community’s racial tensions “in a society still recovering from segregation…. He’s a window into a world that many [white] Christians in Greenwood didn’t know existed.”

Says Marvin Olasky, the editor-in-chief of the WORLD News Group, “I’ve visited DSA twice and been hugely impressed by the way this Christian school educates African-American young men intellectually and spiritually. It’s our 100th national or regional winner over the past 12 years, so Christian compassion is alive and well.”

And that is just the tip of the compassion iceberg, according to journalist Warren Cole Smith. “Those of us involved in ministry or in our local churches know that if the great work of Christian ministries and local churches went away, there would be a giant sucking sound in civil society,” Warren says. “However, most churches and Christian ministries do their work quietly, with little fanfare, so—according to a Pew study—many Americans don’t understand that . . . Christians are more generous with both time and money than their secular neighbors, and that without this generosity, America would be in deep trouble.”

But not if the other Hope Awards regional winners—and countless other organizations offering compassionate ministry—have anything to say about it. These are Navajo Ministries in New Mexico, Hope Pregnancy Ministries in Montana, Village of Hope in Zambia, and New Life Home in New Hampshire.

 

In their great book, Restoring All Things, my friends Warren Cole Smith and John Stonestreet ask a great question: “What is good in our culture that we can promote, protect, and celebrate?” It’s safe to say that WORLD’s Hope Awards are a small but significant answer—and we are all winners because of them

Christianity Today made a big mistake in giving pro death soul a platform

I’ll see your quote and raise you two. For the Colson Center, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

I’m surprised, to put it mildly, that Christianity Today would choose to run an opinion piece on health care by Virginia Senator and former Clinton running mate Tim Kaine.

In the article, entitled “We Need All Parts of the Body to Fix Health Care,” Kaine quotes Scripture at us twice, first 1 Corinthians 12, strangely redirecting Paul’s teaching about the church and applying it to Congress.

Even worse, Senator Kaine then cites Matthew 25, about “the least of these.” Well, perhaps Senator Kaine could expand his definition of “the least of these” to include the unborn? Kaine identifies as a Roman Catholic, but has a 100 percent Planned Parenthood voting record in the Senate—100 percent.

I can’t imagine CT would share their platform with someone so morally compromised on other issues. So why the exception for, of all things, abortion?

Look, Senator, here are two other Scripture passages: Matthew 19: “Let the little children come to me;” and Proverbs 6, “God hates hands that shed innocent blood.”

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Condemning another ( a thought on the Bible )

Listen to a  thought on the Bible by clicking here or read it below.

Hi friends: Should we condemn people. I’m Billy David Dickson with a thought on the Bible.
I believe most of us if not all of us would agree we should not condemn others. Sadly some are condemning someone in a high position.
I want to have a discussion with those of you who have been putting President Trump down as a person. It doesn’t matter if you voted for him, or not. It doesn’t even matter what political party you embrace.
In the Bible in John 3:17 it says Jesus didn’t enter the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.
My friend Cal Thomas did an awesome radio commentary awhile back.Here is what Cal said.” I am a newspaper columnist and a commentator. I am also – first and foremost – a follower of Jesus of Nazareth. The two are not contradictory.”
“As a columnist I comment on public policies and private morals. As a follower of Jesus I try not to condemn people. The difference can be a fine line at times and I admit I don’t always get it right, but I try.”
“Some fellow believers are urging me to condemn President Trump. I can criticize policies and language I may not like, but I refuse to condemn him. I am praying for him that God will make of him what God wants. All power and authority belong to the Father and he puts people in power for His purposes – from Saul, to Clinton, Obama, Bush and Trump. Anyone disagree? If not, pray for the President.”
Amen Cal. I recall when Bill Clinton was in the White House I had a shirt which read Jesus Christ loves Bill Clinton, and you too. ( Romans 5:8. ) It is one thing to disagree with policy. Which we can do, but we should not condemn President Trump, or any other leader, or anyone for that matter. If we are condemning President Trump, we might trying praying for him instead.
That is a thought on the Bible.
Until next time,
I’m Billy David Dickson

All Rights Reserved, 2017
This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.

Look up not all news is bad

It’s been a summer of rough news for America. Racism, riots, and political violence. Communities on the Gulf Coast continue wading through the devastation of hurricane Harvey, and now another storm is bearing down on Florida. We have plenty of reasons to be praying and doing all we can to alleviate suffering. There’s cause for grief about the news—but not for pessimism.

Writing at The Guardian, Oliver Burkeman suggests that despite a dragging civil war in Syria, heart-rending photos of drowned refugees, North Korea’s nuclear saber-rattling, disasters, terrorist attacks, and racial violence, the world is objectively better now than it’s ever been.

Hard to believe? Well, here are the facts: Swedish historian Mark Norberg breaks down global indicators of human flourishing into nine categories: food, sanitation, life expectancy, poverty, violence, the state of the environment, literacy, freedom, equality, and the conditions of childhood. And in nearly all of these categories, we’ve seen vast improvement in my lifetime.

Despite the fact that nine out of ten Americans say worldwide poverty is holding steady or worsening, the percentage of people on this planet who live on less than two dollars a day—what the United Nation’s defines as “extreme poverty”—has fallen below ten percent, which is the lowest it’s ever been.

The scourge of child mortality is also at a record low. Fifty percent fewer children under five die today than did thirty years ago.

Worldwide, 300,000 more people gain access to electricity every day. In 1900, global life expectancy was just 31 years. Today, it’s an impressive 71 years. And violent crime rates in the United States are the lowest they’ve been in half a century.

Nicholas Kristof wasn’t too far afield when he called 2016 “the best year in the history of humanity.” This year may see even more progress.

So why do these cheery pronouncements strike us as inaccurate—even outrageous? Why—according to a recent poll by YouGov—do a vanishingly small six percent of Americans think the world as a whole is becoming a better place?

Burkeman lays much of the blame on the press. Thanks to a 24-hour news cycle that actively seeks out and overplays the worst stories, our perception of the world is skewed. “We are not merely ignorant of the facts,” he writes. “We are actively convinced of depressing ‘facts’ that aren’t true.” And no wonder! It’s hard to sell papers and get Web traffic with good news. No one reports when a plane takes off. They only report when they crash.

But a great deal of the blame for our unjustifiably gloomy view of the world also falls on our shoulders. Quite simply, we often enjoy being angry about the state of the world, especially when it allows us to blame someone else. We are addicted to news-induced anger.

That’s why it’s so important—while acknowledging the desperate evil and suffering around us—to appreciate the good news, the progress, and the things we have to celebrate. After all, how can we truly comprehend what’s wrong with the world if we don’t recognize when something is going right?

War, famine, disease, and hatred should all remind us that God’s world, which He created and pronounced “very good,” is broken, and it’s our fault. But here’s the real comfort: It’s still—as the hymn says—our Father’s world. Let us therefore never forget that “though the wrong seems oft so strong God is the ruler yet.”

As Christians, we know where history is headed, and we know how the story ends—with the redemption and restoration of all things. We who have the good news should be the first to recognize all good news, not in spite of, but in the midst of the bad

This time the good guys won

On Wednesday night last week I had the privilege of serving as guest conductor of Santa Monica Symphony Orchestra at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. It was particularly sweet because of the efforts by many who worked against me. Members of the orchestra and Santa Monica political…

( Read the rest of this commentary, or listen to it right here.)

The case for Christ

Audio

Mickey Mantle New York baseball star gave his life to Christ on his death bed

The following is an excerpt from Richardson’s 2012 book, “Impact Player,” where he details the final conversation he had with Mantle, just days before Mickey passed on.

On the plane, as I realized this likely would be my final visit with Mickey, I prayed for my teammate’s life.

We arrived in Dallas that night. First thing the next morning, I headed to the hospital. I didn’t know what to expect as I pushed open the door.

Mickey flashed his down-home, country-boy smile.

“I can’t wait to tell you this,” Mantle said right away. “I want you to know that I’m a Christian. I’ve accepted Christ as my Savior.”

( Read the rest of this powerful story. )

Charles was wrong on little Charlie

The more I read, and watch Charles Krauthammer the more I struggle if he is truly on the right.
In a recent column Charles kind of stood behind the system in the UK which kept the parents of that little boy Charlie Gard from bringing him to America. Little Charlie died yesterday, and from what I heard the British hospital he was in would not even let his mommy, and daddy take him home to die at their home. Talk about evil, and mean.
The issue in Gard case was not that the tax payers of England having to pay for treatment here in America. The parents had raised money to pay for the treatment themselves.
Krauthammer in his column seem to accept the idea that the courts, and doctors of the U.K. knew what was best.
That is not even the issue. The issue is should they decide if little Charlie was brought to America. Don’t parents have the right to decide about healthcare for their children. Unless there is abuse involved.
Krauthammer writes in his column sometimes parents are wrong. I agree, but what about judges, and doctors. They are not perfect either. But this again should not be about who was right, or who knows what is best for the child. This should have been about who has the right to decide.
When you give a government control of healthcare as has happened in England this kind of issue may happen. Are you listening parents of America. This is another reason us in America needs to get Obamacare off the books. Too bad the Democrats in the Senate along with three GOP senators has made this kind of thing a possibility here in America.