Category Archives: Evil Leaders

The lies that entangle North Korea

North Korea (MNN) — North Korea shows up in the headlines for a variety of reasons. Most recently, it’s been the country’s nuclear arms activity, and the murder of Kim Jong Un’s half-brother, Kim Jong Nam. But if we want to really characterize this country in a phrase, it’s safe to say that North Korea is tangled in lies and deception.

Patrick Klein of Vision Beyond Borders says he’s seen this deception first hand.
On one visit to the country, Klein asked his tour guide several basic questions about Kim Jon Un and his family. The tour guide responded by saying that information had not been released by the government. The people were kept from knowing even the most basic biographical information about their leader.
“There’s this real mystery about it that they can’t have information about his personal life, they can’t know anything about his marital status. We do know he’s been very brutal, even killing his uncle in North Korea for working too closely with the Chinese,” Klein says.
And yet, once outside the country, anyone can do a quick Google search to learn more about the family.

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Lessons from the life of Castro ( a thought on the Bible ) 

Listen to a thought on he Bible right here or read it below. 

Hi I am Billy David Dickson with a thought on the Bible.

    What are we leaving behind in this world. What will people think of us , or say about us , when we are no longer living in this world.

    Those thoughts come to my mind as I reflect on the life of the former President of Cuba Fidel Castro, who passed from this life to the next life at the age of 90 a few months back.

  The western media said things like he loved the people of Cuba. In truth he put many souls from Cuba in prison for speaking out against the Cuban government, or following the Lord instead of following Castro. Other souls he had put to death. 

 I do believe there are things we can learn from the life of Castro.

       The first lesson is what are we leaving behind. What will people think of you and I after we are gone.The people of Cuba, and many souls in the world will not have good things to say about Castro. No matter what the media says. You may not have put souls in prison like Castro, but have you put your job ahead of your family. Have you not been honest with others in business matters. Have you treated others wrongly. 

         The second lesson while we are living we can always change. It is too late for Castro. However you, and I can change with God’s help. We can not change on our own. Philippians 4:13 reads , “I can do all things through him who strengthens me.”

     The last lesson and the most important one is we all are going to die. What will matter is what we did with Christ. The question is do you know him. If you don’t know him after death there is no hope for you. Before you die you can find that hope. All you have to do is admit you are a sinner, and embrace Jesus Christ as your savior. It is too late for Castro. One can only hope he repented of his sins and received Christ. God is going to say when you stand before him, well done good and faithful servant. Or he is going to say the most horrible words I never knew you. What decides what God says is decided by what you do with Christ.

That is a thought on the Bible.

Until next time,

I’m Billy David Dickson

All Rights Reserved, 2017

This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.

A pro life miracle from China 

When we save just one life from abortion, we’re saving the future. I’ll explain with a beautiful story.

Eric Metaxas
A thirteen-year-old girl named Anni is seated at the piano on the stage at Carnegie Hall. She is wearing a neat white dress, and she’s playing brilliantly. The crowd applauds enthusiastically.
That was one month ago. Three years ago, it was a different story. Then, Anni was huddled in a jail cell in China. She was kept there overnight without food, water, or even access to a toilet. The Chinese government had locked her up as retaliation for her father’s activities protesting China’s repressive policies.
The story of how Anni got from there to Carnegie Hall is a miracle—one that teaches us how much God values every human life.
Anni’s father, Zhang Lin, is a nuclear physicist who was himself sent to prison. To get his daughter out of China, he contacted my friend Reggie Littlejohn, founder of Women’s Rights Without Frontiers. Reggie, along with U.S. Representative Chris Smith and others, succeeded in bringing Anni and her sister to the U.S. Praise God. Reggie and her husband took the girls in, to raise as their own daughters.
But this is far from the whole story. You see, if the Chinese government had had its way, Anni would never have been born. Anni was a second child at a time when China’s One Child policy was in brutal effect. Millions of Chinese women were forced to undergo abortions for the “crime” of expecting a second child.
Anni escaped this fate thanks to the courage of her parents. As Reggie posted at the Women’s Rights Without Frontiers website, “Family planning police came daily to pressure Anni’s mother to abort her. Anni’s father was able to get permission for Anni’s birth only after a long and difficult struggle.”
Without their courage, “Anni could easily have been one of the 400 million lives ‘prevented’ by China’s One Child policy of coercive population control, Reggie notes. “Or she could have been selectively aborted because she is a girl, as happens to so many second daughters in China.”
daily_commentary_01_09_17Today, Reggie says, “We are so proud of Anni. She is flourishing, both as a pianist and as a top student. Her story is an example for all those who struggle against the odds. Through our help and her own hard work, Anni is a witness to the hope of a new beginning and to the beauty, brilliance, and infinite value of Chinese girls.”
Anni herself gives all the credit to God—both for her birth and for all her accomplishments. “God did a total miracle, because I never could have made it without His help,” Anni says. “Winning the competition to play in Carnegie Hall was 1 percent me and 99 percent God.”
I’m telling Anni’s story this week because we’re coming up on a tragic anniversary: the 44th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s infamous Roe v. Wade decision. Anni is a reminder of what we lose every day, in America, in China, and all over the world, when a small life is snuffed out. We lose children who might have become pianists, medical researchers, farmers, soldiers, artists, and moms and dads themselves.
We’ll never know what the world has lost thanks to the millions of children who were killed through abortion. But you and I can work to save other babies—all of them with great value in God’s eyes. Children just like Anni.
Before I leave you today, I want to urge you and your church to join our “21 Days of Prayer for Life” campaign. Just come to BreakPoint.org and download our free .pdf prayer guide. And please, please, share the link with others. Maybe your Bible study or family or homeschool group or Christian school class will commit to pray for life this January. Again, get your “21 Days of Prayer for Life”—download it at BreakPoint.org.

Believe it or not the U.N. honored the late Cuba leader Fidel Castro 

Read the story.

Boris Yeltsin trip to a simple grocery store changed him forever.

Read or listen to the commentary here.

Today December 7th a day which will live in infamy 

Today is December 7 – a day that President Roosevelt said would be “a date which will live in infamy.” On that fateful morning of December 7, 1941, America was attacked without warning. More than 2,400 Americans died and 1,100 were wounded. Our country was changed forever. This attack led us into war, and the citizens of America responded with courage and resolve. So it may be well to reflect on what took place and how we today…

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Fidel Castro laid to rest in private funeral but there is something bigger to ask 

Castro’s ashes were placed in a granite mausoleum Sunday morning during a private ceremony attended by Castro’s little-seen family and a handful of Latin American and African leaders, Cuban state media reported.
The three-minute ceremony at Santiago de Cuba’s Santa Ifigenia Cemetery ended nine days of public mourning for the charismatic but polarizing revolutionary who led Cuba for half a century.

( Billy’s thoughts – The question which none of the media brought up, and for sure the Cuba media rejected talking about the most important thing is where is Castro now. Read the rest of the above story here. )

We can judge Castro,  we don’t have to wait for history to judge him 

Sometimes history doesn’t have to wait to judge — and when it comes to dictators, even dead ones, we shouldn’t either.
With news of Fidel Castro’s death Friday — finalmente — world leaders began offering eulogies, some of which were so vapid or willfully ignorant that Castro might have written them himself. It would appear in any case that the 20th century’s quintessential “Big Brother” managed to infect a few world leaders with an Orwellian strain of mushy-mouthed aphasia.
Apparently bereft of the right words, they treated Castro’s brutality as polite unmentionables, serving up platitudes as though just another important figure had passed on to his maker.
Did they miss the screams?
Growing up in Florida during the Cuban Missile Crisis, running bomb shelter drills and hearing the stories of refugees who became lifelong friends, I somehow managed to evade the charms of the revolutionary rogue, who merely replaced one dictatorship with another far worse. There’s nothing sentimental about a ruthless dictator who once held the world hostage to a possible nuclear Armageddon.

It’s one thing to be respectful of the Cuban people — and I’m not suggesting we celebrate anyone’s death. But it is another to sidestep the historical horrors of a murderous, 60-year military regime and strike a pose of diplomatic equanimity that assuages only gluttons of insincerity.

( Billy’s thoughts – Read the rest of the above column by Kathleen Parker right here. I hope Castro repented of his sinful life, and for his evil deeds before he faced his maker. ) 

Farewell Fidel

Listen to a radio commentary here.

González, now 22, returns to public eye to praise Fidel Castro( Thank you President Clinton, and Janet Reno ) 

HAVANA — Elián González, the boy who found himself at the center of a controversial custody battle between his father in Cuba and his relatives in the United States 16 years ago, on Sunday praised Fidel Castro, who, he said, made it possible for him to return to his home country.

González, now 22, appeared on a government-run television program and said Castro, who died on Friday at the age of 90, was like a father and a friend to him.
“He is my father who, like my father, I wanted to show him everything I achieved. That he would be proud of me. That’s how I was with Fidel,” González said in a subtitled portion of the interview posted online by NBC Latino. “If I learned something and wanted to show him, and there are still many things that I wanted to show him. … And that in a public event he said he considered me a friend, it was an honor.”
González was 5 years old when his mother and several others voyaged by boat from Cuba to get to the U.S. His mother died, but the boy survived and was rescued by fishermen. He was later taken to his relatives’ home in South Florida. What followed was an international tug-o-war waged by Castro, who had led demonstrations demanding that González be returned to his father.
In April 2000, heavily armed federal immigration agents raided the relatives’ home in Miami. González was found in a bedroom halfway inside a closet as Donato Dalrymple, one of the fishermen who rescued him from the Atlantic Ocean, carried him in his arms.
A picture from the raid shows González, crying as he looked at the armed federal agent. Agents reported that the boy was calm afterward. He was later reunited with his father, stepmother and 6-month-old half-brother.

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