Category Archives: history

Who MEMORIAL Day is for, and who the holiday is not for

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Today Thursday, May 4th, 2017 is the National Day of Prayer

 

Perhaps  one of the most powerful calls to prayer came from President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. In 1863, he issued a proclamation for a day of “humiliation, fasting and prayer.” Here is some of that proclamation: “We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven. We have been preserved, these many years, in peace and prosperity. We have grown in numbers, wealth and power, as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace, and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us.”

 

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Jewish Christmas

Jesus the Jew

The debate on the doctrine of grace, and Luther ( view of a Catholic, and the view of a Protestant ) 

( Read the two pieces below, and check them out with Bible to see who you agree with. A church can be wrong, or a spiritual leader can be wrong, but God,and his book the Bible are never wrong. )

Grace Alone’ 500 Years Later A Catholic perspective.
Grace Alone’: Luther Nails It A Protestant responds to Catholic critiques of ‘Grace Alone.’

The problem in American parenting is the 1960s, and they got it all wrong 

The problem in American parenting is the 1960s. Among other things that defined that very interesting decade was the replacement of rationality by emotionality. It was during the 1960s that the media, various self-appointed spiritual gurus, and the mental health professional community urged people to “get in touch with their feelings.” And it was during the 1960s that parents were told by mental health professionals that children had a right to express their feelings freely.
I was in graduate school at the time. My professors taught that (a) feelings—especially children’s feelings—held deep meaning, (b) therapy was all about helping people recover the feelings their parents had made them repress, and (c) getting in touch with one’s feelings was the key to happiness. To be polite about it, a crock if there ever was one.

Read the rest of this column. )

What really happened to the class of 65.. 

Listen to a commentary by Dr. Dobson, right here.

Forgiveness and Reconciliation for Our Times( The Descendants of Dred Scott Show the Way )

( Listen to the Breakpoint commentary here, or read it below. )
On the 160th anniversary of one of the worst Supreme Court decisions, something beautiful and miraculous happened.

Last week, March 6th, marked the 160th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s infamous Dred Scott decision. Dred Scott v. Sanford, along with Plessy v. Ferguson (which enshrined the principle of “separate but equal”) and Roe v. Wade, form a kind of unholy trinity of Supreme Court rulings which legally declared entire classes of people non-persons.
Yet this infamous decision recently became the occasion for a remarkable act of grace.
First some historical background: For the decades preceding the 1857 decision, the country was torn over the issue of slavery. While actual abolitionists did form a small majority in the North (and ideas of racial equality were rare even among abolitionists), northern whites did not want to compete against slave labor in the territories west of the Mississippi river.
That brings me to Dred Scott the man. In 1830, his second master took him from Missouri, a slave state, to Illinois, where slavery was illegal. In 1836, both returned to Missouri. After several attempts to buy his and his family’s freedom, Scott sued his master’s estate, claiming that under what was known as the “Somerset Rule,” which could be summed up as “once free, always free,” his late master had, in effect, set him free by moving him to a free state.
And that brings me to Dred Scott the decision. Chief Justice Taney could have decided Scott’s case on narrow terms. But he had something far more ambitious in mind: He wanted to settle the slavery issue once and for all.
The least infamous part of his opinion ruled that Congress could not ban slavery in the territories, thus making the Civil War all but inevitable.
The most infamous part concerned the status of African Americans. He ruled that Blacks, enslaved or free, could not be citizens of the United States. He justified this by writing that, historically-speaking, Blacks had been “regarded as beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations; and so far inferior, that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.”
Like I said, infamous.
All of this makes what happened last week on the 160th anniversary of the decision so remarkable. Standing before the Maryland State House, Charlie Taney, a descendant of Roger Taney, apologized on his family’s behalf, to Scott’s descendants and African Americans in general for the “terrible injustice of the Dred Scott decision.”
Then Scott’s great-great granddaughter, Lynne Jackson, accepted the apology on behalf of “all African Americans who have the love of God in their heart so that healing can begin.”
I’m guessing I know where Ms. Jackson spends her Sunday mornings.
Some people will no doubt dismiss this as a kind of theater. After all, Charlie Taney isn’t responsible for what his ancestor wrote. But that misses the point.
What’s going on here is the acknowledgment of an historical wrong followed by an act of grace which holds out the possibility of a new beginning–in other words, what the New Testament calls “reconciliation.”
Reconciliation comes from a Greek word whose principle meaning is “exchange.” In fact, it was principally used in reference to money-changing, where the parties exchanged coins of equal worth.
In this case something far more valuable than money is being exchanged: the acknowledgement of past wrongs for a restoration of relationships and the possibility of, to use another biblical term, shalom: peace, wholeness, and contentment.
Despite Justice Taney’s best efforts, Dred Scott died a free man. His first master’s family bought him back from the estate with the express purpose of freeing him. Many thanks to Mr. Scott’s and Justice Taney’s descendants for showing us the path to reconciliation in these divisive times.

Valentine’s Day is rooted in church history and not an invention of greeting card companies.

Listen to, or read the commentary by going here.

Do you believe the President said this…

          “ALL AMERICANS, NOT ONLY IN THE STATES MOST AFFECTED, BUT IN EVERY PLACE IN THIS COUNTRY, ARE RIGHTLY DISTURBED BY THE LARGE NUMBER OF ILLEGAL ALIENS ENTERING OUR COUNTRY. THE JOBS THEY HOLD MIGHT OTHERWISE BE HELD BY CITIZENS OR LEGAL IMMIGRANTS. THE PUBLIC SERVICES THEY USE IMPOSE BURDENS ON OUR TAXPAYERS. THAT’S WHY OUR ADMINISTRATION HAS MOVED AGGRESSIVELY TO SECURE OUR BORDERS MORE BY HIRING A RECORD NUMBER OF NEW BORDER GUARDS, BY DEPORTING TWICE AS MANY ILLEGAL ALIENS AS EVER BEFORE, BY CRACKING DOWN ON ILLEGAL HIRING, BY BARRING WELFARE BENEFITS TO ILLEGAL ALIENS.” THE PRESIDENT PROMISED TO DO MORE “TO SPEED THE

DEPORTATION OF ILLEGAL ALIENS CONVICTED OF CRIMES AND TO DO A BETTER JOB OF IDENTIFYING ILLEGAL ALIENS IN THE WORKPLACE.”
         “WE ARE A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS,” THE PRESIDENT CONTINUED, “BUT WE ARE ALSO A NATION OF LAWS. IT IS WRONG AND ULTIMATELY SELF DEFEATING FOR A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS TO PERMIT THE KIND OF ABUSE OF OUR IMMIGRATION LAWS WE HAVE SEEN IN RECENT YEARS AND WE MUST DO MORE TO STOP IT.”
         Yes the President said those things. Are you on the left ready to hang him? Well yes the President said those things. Guess what it was not Donald Trump. It was President Bill Jefferson Clinton.          
( Source Cal Thomas commentary for Feb. 8th, 2017.

Why Mary Tyler Moore Refused to Join the Feminist Movement ( she thought being a mother was important ) 

The article is here.