Category Archives: church issue

A church started by teens

Have you ever heard of a congregation planting a new church through teenagers?
( Read more )

Eugene Peterson should have had a plan to stand for the Bible the first time in a sinful culture

Now, I’m incredulous that bestselling Christian author Eugene Peterson, known for “The Message,” a popular paraphrased version of the Bible, seems not to have thought through how he would publicly address this subject. A couple of weeks ago, two years into the Obergefell regime, Reverend Peterson was asked in an interview about his view on the morality of same-sex marriages. After winding around the issue a bit, he stated, “it’s not a right or wrong thing as far as I’m concerned.” When asked if he’d perform a same sex ceremony, he said simply, “Yes.”

The evangelical world reacted swiftly and with disappointment. Shelf space for Reverend Peterson’s books seemed at risk.

A few days later, he issued a retraction, stating, “I affirm a biblical view of everything.”

Al Mohler, President of Southern Baptist Seminary and an astute commentator on culture, wrote that there are lessons to learn from what he termed “The Agonizing Ordeal of Eugene Peterson.”
( Read the rest of this commentary. )

Holding church in a bar

Read the story.

Deism and America’s Founders

Read some commentaries on the men who were used to put America together,here or listen to the audit of them.

Who should be in charge of your kid’s care ? You, or the government ? In the UK, it is the government who is heartless by wanting little Charlie to die !

Can the government tell you when and where your child will die? For one couple in the U.K., the answer is “yes.” This is a chilling precedent.

 

An incredibly complicated and heartbreaking life-and-death medical case has sparked an international debate: It’s the case of little Charlie Gard.

Charlie suffers from an extremely rare and deadly genetic disorder called Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Syndrome. Mitochondria “are structures within cells that convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use.” Because of his depletion of mitochondrial DNA, Charlie’s muscles and organs are failing. He’s unconscious and cannot breathe on his own. From all reports, he’s in the terminal stages of a disease for which there is no known cure.

Charlie’s parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, have raised a million and a half dollars in private donations to take him to America for an experimental treatment. They appear under no illusion that the treatment will work, but they do want to exhaust every possibility.

But doctors at Britain’s Great Ormond Street Hospital have decided that Charlie’s condition is hopeless, and that he should be left to die. Britain’s High Court agreed, and the European Court of Human rights refused to intervene after Charlie’s parents appealed. The doctors now have the legal go-ahead to take Charlie off life support.

Now world reaction has been decidedly on the side of Charlie’s parents. After some initial confusion within the Vatican, the Vatican’s pediatric hospital offered to take care of Charlie, as has at least one American hospital. Even President Trump tweeted over the weekend, “If we can help little #CharlieGard, … we would be delighted to do so.”

As I record this broadcast, these offers have all fallen on deaf ears. The hospital refuses to let Charlie travel or even die at home with his parents. They’ve kept him on life support to give Charlie and his parents just a little more time together.

Those are the facts as I understand them. But now here’s why this case is so important, both for the sake of Charlie and his family, and for our civilization.

First, the government should have no role in dictating when and where a baby should die, and whether his parents can seek additional treatment options. The decision by the British High Court is an appalling overreach, and it sets a very dangerous precedent. In worldview terms, the government is well beyond its sphere of sovereignty, gobbling up authority that rightfully belongs to the family and to the church.

Second Peter clarifies that the civil authorities are ordained by God to reward good and punish evil. Great Ormond Street Hospital and the British and international courts have determined it’s time for little Charlie to die, regardless of how many people around the world want to help him by paying for transportation and additional treatment. They won’t even allow him to die at home. They’ve effectively asserted ownership over this little boy and his life. This is unambiguously wrong.

And the facts don’t support the European Court of Human Rights’ claim that undergoing experimental treatment would expose Charlie to “continued pain, suffering and distress.” As one official at the hospital where he’s being cared for admitted, doctors “don’t know whether he suffers pain.”

And, we should note, the British government is in this position of superseded authority largely because of the breakdown of the family. Courts and officials there are accustomed to playing mom, dad, even sometimes God. And we’re not that far behind here in the United States.

But that doesn’t mean the government has the right to make the kinds of life-and-death decisions that Charlie’s parents and others are called to make, nor is it best equipped to navigate the unique challenges of such a difficult case. When it comes to this little life, by overstepping, hospital officials and judges have handed down a death sentence that isn’t theirs to render.

BAPTISM

( Audio )

Listen to a commentary on this important subject. What is BAPTISM, and what is it not.

 

Many pro-life Catholics are dismayed over changes at the Pontifical Academy for Life.Including the naming of a pro abortion doctor

Here the story.

Sin in the family of God ( A thought on the Bible )

Listen to a thought on the Bible. You can also read it below.

How should your church deal with sin with somebody in the body of Christ ? How should my church deal with sin of somebody in it’s body who has committed willful sin.
Hi I’m Billy David Dickson with a thought on the Bible.
Sadly there are immoral behaviors being committed by folks who are followers of Jesus in our world.
That brings up a tough issue for churches which are submitted to the Lordship of God’s book, the Bible.
They don’t want to give a blessing to willful sin by those in her body. At the same time the church is called to be a place where grace is extended. The church after all is a hospital for sinners.
I believe at times there is a place for church discipline.
A bigger question however is not how our churches will respond to sin among children of God, but how you and I should respond when a brother, or sister is involved in immoral behavior.
To answer that question we just have to open our Bibles to John chapter 8. Here some religious folks have brought to Jesus a lady caught in adultery.
Here is how John 8 reads…
3″ The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery, and placing her in the midst 4 they said to him, “Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. 5 Now in the Law, Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” 6 This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. 7 And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” 8 And once more he bent down and wrote on the ground. 9 But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. 10 Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” 11 She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.”
Did Jesus condemn this lady caught in sin. No he did not. Too often us believers try to be the Holy Spirit. One of the jobs of the Holy Spirit is to convict believers of sin. That is not our job. There might be times when it is proper to point out a sin to a brother, or sister in Christ. We should never condemn another member of the family of God.When we find out another believer is in willful sin we should pray for him. If possible we should reach out to her in Christian love.And out attitude should be, if it was not for the grace of God,I could be where that soul is.

That is a thought on the Bible.
Until next time,
I’m Billy David Dickson

All Rights Reserved, 2017
This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/

Is Jesus the only way ?

Listen to some commentaries or read them.

I disagree with Breakpoint more religious faith is not always good

( Billy’s thoughts – Below is a Breakpoint commentary. This is one time when I disagree with the host of Breakpoint. In the commentary the host says it is a good thing people are becoming more religious.

No debate if by religious faith we mean following the God of the Bible the Lord Jesus. At the same time you can be religious, and not know Jesus. You can even be committed to a church, and be lost spirituality.

For example I know people in the Catholic Church who love the Lord. However when the leadership of that church teaches Mary is sinless they are in conflict with the word of God. All have sin. Everyone including Mary needs Jesus as their Savior. When the Pope says we don’t have to go through Jesus to go to heaven, there is a problem. The key is not to be religious, but to know Jesus Christ who many Catholic folks do know.Faith in King Jesus is what people need. Not religious faith.

Read the commentary below, and decide what you think based on the Bible, and a Christian worldview. )

Ever hear the old saw that religious people are on the wrong side of history? It isn’t true. Turns out, we’re on the right side of the future as well. Stay tuned to BreakPoint.

A year ago, National Geographic told readers that “religion is rapidly becoming less important than it’s ever been, even to people who live in countries where faith has affected everything from rulers to borders to architecture.”

But as Rodney Stark documented in his recent book, “The Triumph of Faith,” that statement is wrong. In fact, it’s the opposite of the truth. According to Stark, “The world is not merely as religious as it used to be. In important ways, it is much more intensely religious than ever before . . .”

This shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise. For years, Chuck Colson, John Stonestreet, and I have been telling you about the explosive growth of Christianity around the world, especially in what is called the “global south.”

We’ve told you about what’s happening in places like sub-Saharan Africa, and even China, which, by some estimates may have more Christians than any other country by the middle of this century.

But the story that Stark tells goes beyond these two examples. The growth of Christianity in Latin America is, in many respects, just as amazing as its growth in Africa.

That might sound strange, since Latin America has been ostensibly Christian since the sixteenth century. But until the mid-20th century, it was largely a nominal kind of Christianity. As recently as the 1950s, only between 10 and 20 percent of Latin Americans were “active in their faith.”

The arrival of Protestant missionaries, especially Pentecostals, changed this. Not only did they succeed in turning nominal Christians into practicing ones, they also forced the Catholic Church to, as they say in sports, “up its game.” This, in large measure, took the form of the Charismatic renewal.

Today, Charismatic Catholic rallies fill the same stadiums as Pentecostal ones. And the result is that in large parts of Latin America, sixty percent or more of the people attend church on at least a weekly basis.

Another largely untold story is what’s happening in India. The son of a BreakPoint colleague recently traveled to India. One Tuesday, he went to Mass. When he arrived, he was stunned to see that the church was full—so full that the worshippers poured out onto the street. On a Tuesday.

Late last year, Christianity Today ran a story on “Incredible Indian Christianity.” Since 1980, the number of pastors sent out by the Delhi Bible Institute has grown from 100 per year to nearly 7,600 in 2015. As CT tells us, part of India’s so-called “tribal belt,” which runs across central and northeast India, is becoming India’s “Bible belt.”

But even in Europe and the United States, the rise of secularism has been overstated, if by “secularism,” you mean “denying the supernatural.” For example, sociologists consider Iceland to be one of the most secular nations on Earth. Yet, here’s a list of things that a significant percentage of Icelanders believe in: reincarnation, elves, gnomes, fairies, fortune tellers, and Spiritualism. You find similar results across so-called “secular” Europe.

Here in the U.S., the same period that witnessed the rise in the religiously unaffiliated did not witness a decline in church attendance or an increase in atheists. The increase in the so-called “nones” was a function of people who rarely, if ever, attended church finally admitting as much.

Those who claim that people of faith were “on the wrong side of history” have it exactly backwards. Religion, especially Christianity, is not in decline. It’s going from strength-to-strength. You just need to know where to look, or, in this case, what to read.