Category Archives: courts

Junior high Sexual offender

A junior high kid in Texas could be labeled a sex  offender. “The 14 year old is being tried for aggravated sexual assault of a child for having sex with his 12 year old girlfriend.” That is what the Houston Chronicle reported.

“He had consensual sex with his little girlfriend and he loved her. They were boyfriend-girlfriend,” the teen’s mother told the Chronicle.

Most of the time I am for bringing the hammer down on those who have sex with children. But if what I read is correct this was two kids having sex. Instead of labeling the 14 year old, or putting him on trial it might be better to teach him along with his girl friend why it is wrong for them to have a sexual relationship.
( If you like you can read more about this case by clicking here.

Trinity Lutheran before the Supreme Court

( Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. )

Okay, so government cannot “establish religion.” We get that. But can it discriminate against religion? We’ll find out.

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in what David French, over at the National Review called “the most important case about recycled tires in American legal history.”

Now French was, of course, being facetious. As he made clear, while the case did involve recycled tires, the critical thing is its potential impact on religious freedom.

The basic facts of the case, Trinity Lutheran Church v. Pauley, are as follows: Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Missouri, operates a licensed pre-school and day-care facility. Its facilities include the type of playground that you and I played on as kids. In other words, scrapes, bruises, broken bones, and, perhaps, a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Fortunately, or so it seemed for Trinity Lutheran, the state of Missouri has a program which provides “funds for qualifying organizations to purchase recycled tires to resurface playgrounds.”

Trinity Lutheran applied for such a grant and seemed to have easily met the qualifications. I say “seemed,” because it was then informed that such a grant would, in Trinity’s case, violate a provision in Missouri’s state constitution that “no money shall ever be taken from the public treasury, directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, section or denomination of religion.”

The provision is one of 36 so-called “Blaine Amendments” in state constitutions. These amendments were originally aimed at Catholic schools and were born of the now-incredible belief that the public schools were a principal instrument in safeguarding America’s Protestant Christian character.

I know, ironic.

The church sued the state government, claiming that this kind of singling out of churches violated the free exercise of religion. After all, whatever else the free exercise of religion means, it should, at a minimum, mean that you can’t be denied a government benefit available to similar organizations solely on account of your religion.

Case closed, right? Well, unfortunately, no. The First Amendment reads “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Thus while Trinity Lutheran argued the “prohibiting the free exercise thereof” part, the state emphasized the “no law respecting an establishment of religion” part.

If you’re wondering how protecting kids from scrapes and broken bones constitutes “an establishment of religion,” well, welcome to the tortured world of establishment clause jurisprudence. The late justice Scalia wrote that the cases involving Christmas displays required “scrutiny more commonly associated with interior decorators than with the judiciary.”

While I can only speculate what Scalia would have made of this case, it was clear from oral arguments that the majority of the court was skeptical of Missouri’s claim that protecting kids on a playground constitutes an establishment of religion.

If there was a theme to most of the questions, it was just how “extreme,” to use David French’s word, Blaine amendments like Missouri’s are. Justice Breyer asked the lawyer defending the law if, under the constitution, a city could deny fire and police to places of worship while providing it for everyone else. The reply was a hedged semi-“yes.”

While it’s always risky to predict the outcome based on oral arguments, French is right when he predicts that Trinity Lutheran will win.

Actually, it already has. Missouri’s new governor has announced a change in the policy that will permit Trinity Lutheran to apply for the grant. But Missouri’s Blaine Amendment, and three dozen similar provisions across the country, still stand.

So while the Court could declare the case moot, let’s pray that it decides the case in a way that deals a major blow to laws like Missouri’s across the country. Because the damage done by them to religious freedom is a lot worse than just skinned knees.

midwife is being forced to perform abortions ( I guess she can’t make the choice to be pro life ) 

Swedish midwife loses fight to be exempt from performing abortions

Teacher looks at potential, not the sinful/youthful act some teens did to her: 

Recently three high school teens in my city gave their teacher frosting which was mixed with their own semen. All three of the freshman planned the act, but only two went through with it.  The court handled out the punishment for two of the teens this week. The 15 year old boys must complete 40 hours of community service within five months and write apology letters to the teacher within 10 days. 

The teens must take decision-making and victim empathy courses, attend counseling and be involved in a social activity or hold a part-time job. They are also required to live with their parents, and follow all their rules.

What I found really amazing is the attitude of the teacher who was the victim. She told a probation officer that her concern was for the young men. The teacher said she desired them to move on and live successful lives. She didn’t want them to be scarred and wants them to move forward and realize their potential. 

  What a great attitude this teacher has. Part of me thinks these boys should be caned, but it is very cool somebody is not looking at the sinful -youthful act they did, but at what they can become. Good for her. Lets wish her, and these teens the best.

( Source Omaha.com Facebook page)

My respect for this judge has grown, on the other hand my respect for some Senators from the left has gone down

Here are some thoughts I posted on a friend’s Facebook page about the hearings taking place for President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court.     I think he did a great job of answering the questions from the Senators who were trying to trap him in my view. . I was also proud of the Nebraska US senator Ben Sasse when his turn came up to ask the judge a question. The left is doing everything to keep this good man off of the court. It does drive one nuts. He s a judge he should not comment on current court cases, or possible court cases. He is doing well with his answers. I am not sure I could have self control. 

       I also saw one Senator cut him off and didn’t let him complete his answer. The reason they didn’t have time. Well if the senator had not taken so much of his time in asking a question about a court case, they would have had time for the judge’s full answer.

    Pray for this judge. After watching a little of the hearing today my respect for this judge has grown. My respect for some senators outside of the one from Nebraska has gone down. Perhaps we should have hearings on weather these senators can serve in government. 

Mercy,  forgiveness for Omaha woman who killed her mother

Read the story right here.

Pastor Falwell speaks for, ( should ) for all Evangelical Pastors, and churches 

This video goes back awhile, but still it has a good message for us who call ourselves Evangelical followers of Jesus. 

video )

Good for these middle schools, and these parents instead of being concerned about their child rights should support the school

Drugs are a big problem today. Even sadly  among middle school kids. Here is a video about some middle schools who are doing drug tests on their student’s, and some parents who believe it, or not who are fighting it. Children including middle school children do not have rights like adults. The schools of today need to do everything possible to rid the schools of drugs, and help the kids who are hooked on them. 

When a kid is hurt, do not be concerned about the hurt young person,instead focus on those who feelings are hurt by prayer ( give me a break ) 


A school district is under attack by atheists after an anti-Christian group filed a virulent complaint against a Tennessee school system because its staff bowed their heads while a youth pastor prayed for a seriously injured high school football player down on the field.
When the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) caught wind of coaches bowing their heads while an adult got down on his knees to pray for an injured player on the field, it filed a complaint against the district that includes East Ridge High School and Central High School.
Need permission to pray?
Pastor Eric Dill of Bayside Baptist Church insists that his intention was solely to help the injured player – not to make anyone feel uncomfortable, make a religious statement, for recognition or to get 25,000 Facebook views – which were triggered from FFRF’s complaint.
Dill came to the aid of a player who was down on the field for nearly half an hour after receiving a hard blow to the neck that made him unable to move his legs while waiting for an ambulance.
“A neck injury is the scariest part of football,” the youth pastor told WRCB TV, adding that when a player asked him to pray, he merely submitted to God’s will. “It was almost dead silence … about the only thing I could hear on the field was like sniffling, and just players getting emotional.”

( Atheist group challenges prayer for injured player )

Judge Neil GorsuchA GREAT CHOICE FOR THE SUPREME COURT

Judge Neil Gorsuch is President Trump’s nomination for the Supreme Court. And a great nomination it is.

John Stonestreet
As you’ve no doubt heard, on Tuesday night President Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.
The president said that the nomination of Gorsuch was the fulfillment of a campaign promise to “find the very best judge in America” to sit on the Supreme Court.
From where I sit, it looks like Mr. Trump may have delivered on his promise. Only time will tell of course, but we’ve many reasons to be hopeful about how Gorsuch will rule on issues of importance to Christians and Americans.
As G.K. Chesterton once noted, what matters most when considering someone’s qualifications is their philosophy—what they believe about life and the world. What matters most for a Supreme Court justice is their legal philosophy. And it’s difficult to imagine a more reassuring testimonial than the one Gorsuch received from Colson Center friend and Wilberforce Award Winner Robert George of Princeton.
George noted that Gorsuch and he both studied under Oxford philosopher John Finnis, one of the pre-eminent natural law theorists in the world. George added that, in addition to being academically gifted, Gorsuch is “deeply committed to the (actual) Constitution and the rule of law. [Gorsuch] will not manufacture ‘rights’ or read things into the Constitution that aren’t there or read things out of the Constitution that are.”
This is encouraging coming from the eminent Robby George. But that latter observation was also made by former Obama administration solicitor general Neal Katyal in a New York Times opinion piece titled, “Why Liberals Should Back Neil Gorsuch.”
Even more encouraging are those things judge Gorsuch himself has written, starting with the most important issue of them all, the sanctity and dignity of human life from conception to natural death.
In his 2006 book, “The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia,” Gorsuch made clear his opposition to so-called “death with dignity” laws, like the one just approved in his and in my home state of Colorado.
daily_commentary_02_02_17His opposition is grounded on the “inviolability” of human life. As he wrote, “All human beings are intrinsically valuable . . . and the intentional taking of human life by private persons is always wrong.”
He goes on to say that “We have all witnessed, as well, family, friends, or medical workers who have chosen to provide years of loving care to persons who may suffer from Alzheimer’s or other debilitating illnesses precisely because they are human persons, not because doing so instrumentally advances some other hidden objective.”
Gorsuch’s words are especially welcome since, as we’ve talked about on BreakPoint, the next great front in the battle for the sanctity of life, and likely for religious freedom, will be over end-of-life issues like assisted-suicide and euthanasia.
Speaking of religious freedom, Gorsuch sided with Hobby Lobby in its challenge to the HHS Mandate. In his concurring opinion he wrote the HHS mandate infringed on the religious liberties of the Green family, which owns Hobby Lobby, “by requiring them to lend what their religion teaches to be an impermissible degree of assistance to the commission of what their religion teaches to be a moral wrong.”
He also sided with the Little Sisters of the Poor in their case for conscience rights. And as an added bonus, he’s a really good writer of legal opinions, something we miss and need since the death of Justice Scalia.
So what now? Well, we should pray for Gorsuch and his family, given the fractious state of our politics. And of course, urge your Senators (even those who have said they will oppose Judge Gorsuch) to confirm this spectacularly qualified nominee to the Supreme Court. Please let your voice be heard.
We’ve collected resources for you to learn more about judge Gorsuch at our website at BreakPoint.org.