Category Archives: current event

He couldn’t have won the award now named after him!:

Princeton Theological Seminary just reversed the decision to recognize Tim Keller, pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian in Manhattan, for his church-planting and public witness.

( Read, or listen to the rest of this commentary.)

The freedom caucus was wrong, they should have voted for the healthcare bill to move the process on……

video

One Nebraska State Senator doesn’t care how the voters of the state voted on Capital Punishment 

The story is here.

Leaders in Omaha, Nebraska can not stop a strip club from opening 

Read the story from the Omaha.com Facebook page.

An Unlikely View…a Different Review on Beauty and the Beast

This movie was not created to be a catalyst for the gospel. It was not designed with an agenda to lead people to the cross or challenge them in their walk with the Lord…and yet that is exactly what our family took away. Was there sin in the movie – yes. There was a hateful man that treated women and men like the dirt beneath his feet, who lied, who abused, who lifted himself above everyone else. There was the inclusion of magic, of prejudice, the belittling of women, the hint of homosexuality, the abuse of the elderly, the worship of idols to name just a few. Not a one of these sins greater than the next; not a one less ungodly than the the other. None of them so blatant – all just a piece of the tapestry of the film. As a mama, I had a choice. I could have pointed out all of these things to my children before going into the theater.I could have painted a picture of hating all of these things and they would have watched the movie through that lens – absolutely. Instead, I asked them to view with God in mind. They did observe those same things, these sinful moments, but with the perspective of God in mind they viewed them with a broken heart, from a place of understanding our need for Jesus in this world. My little girl hopeful that she too would come to a place where she trusted the hope that is in Jesus – that she doesn’t have to be a ‘beast ‘ forever. My oldest challenged in his faith, strengthened in his walk. Their mama moved beyond what she can adequately express.

( Billy’s thoughts – Read the rest of this thought provoking post. )

Be an encourager, don’t just protest the bad 

( Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. )

When it comes to culture, do you consider yourself a foot soldier or a gardener? Okay, that’s a bit cryptic. But let me explain.
When was the last time you participated in a boycott? Or shared a Facebook post alerting your friends to a dangerous cultural trend?
Good stuff. Now, let me ask you this: When was the last time you went to an art museum? Or bought tickets to the theater? Or listened to a great piece of music? Or wrote a poem and shared it with friends?
I ask, because, I believe even more important for Christians than being on the front lines of the culture war is participating in the culture—and better yet, helping to create and nurture it. If the main contribution that Christians make to culture is complaining about it, we’re doing something wrong.
That’s what my friend Makoto Fujimura says in his new book, “Culture Care: Reconnecting with Beauty for Our Common Life.” You may have heard me interview Fujimura before. He’s a brilliant artist and writer who has thought long and hard about the relationship between faith and the arts. “Culture,” he argues, “is not a territory to be won or lost but a resource we are called to steward with care. Culture is a garden to be cultivated.”
In other words, Fujimura wants us to shift our thinking away from the “culture wars” model, in which we think of culture as a battleground. Of course we need to have convictions about culture, and to stand by them. But Fujimura wants to offer a better way for us to influence culture for good. His image of a garden is just one of many he draws from nature, to show how we can carefully and patiently help to cultivate that cultural environment and make good things grow in it.
So, how do we do this? Fujimura suggests that both Christians and the arts community start by learning to look at each other as potential allies, even friends, instead of as sworn enemies. He asks us to consider investing in cultural works, as we’re able to afford it. (As an example, he mentions customers who have purchased his own paintings by giving him a little money every month until they were fully paid for.) He suggests that leaders in the church, the arts community, and the business community form partnerships to help support each other and nurture the culture around them. He cites the example of singer Mahalia Jackson, who encouraged Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to “tell ’em about the dream,” spurring him to make his most famous speech. Such encouragement can flow in both directions.
This isn’t always easy work, but it’s extremely valuable and worthwhile. It requires thoughtful engagement instead of blanket condemnation, and it may call for us to broaden our understanding and deal with ideas that seem unfamiliar and uncomfortable. But from such efforts come moments that he calls “generative,” or “life-giving.” Christians who enjoy and support art and culture, who make it a priority in their lives, and who reach out to those in the arts instead of reflexively pushing them away, can help bring the culture toward a renewed appreciation of goodness, truth, and beauty. And that is good for everyone.
Fujimura acknowledges that Christians in the arts, or even just Christians who love the arts, can feel caught between two worlds. But he argues that this is not a bad thing. The person in this position may in fact be playing “a role of cultural leadership in a new mode, serving functions including empathy, memory, warning, guidance, mediation, and reconciliation.”
One of the best things about “Culture Care” is Fujimura’s optimism about our future—especially if you’re feeling a bit weary and battle-scarred from the culture wars. He firmly believes that, as tough as this cultural moment is, we can turn it into a “genesis moment” by learning to nurture and care for our culture and those who create it. If you want to be part of that effort, I can’t think of a better way to start than by picking up this excellent book.

The power of a story 

Listen to a commentary here.

Some in the GOP including some on the right failed the American voter, and failed President Trump ( Thank you!!!!! )

How disappointing the bill to kill Obamacare looks to be dead.      Thanks GOP. One of the reasons you were put in office was to rid the nation of this horrible law.

  You have failed the American voters, along with failing President Trump. 

     You wanted a perfect bill, and now we have none. Thanks Congressman Beacon here from Nebraska for supporting this bill. 

     I am outrage at the GOP including those on the right.

Anyone listening to the confirmation hearings for the Secretary of Education would think that America’s public school system was in great shape. 

Anyone listening to the confirmation hearings for the Secretary of Education would think that America’s public school system was in great shape. In fact, the Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus even warned that the new secretary “will have an incredibly harmful impact on public education and on black communities nationwide.”
Most people don’t agree with that assessment. The editorial board of the Chicago Tribune criticized the secretary’s critics. “Instead of lauding DeVos for trying to break a failing status quo in places like Detroit, a handful of U.S. senators tried their best to depict her as an out-of-touch nincompoop whose goal was to destroy public schools. Yet half of the Democrats on the committee either went to private school themselves or had children or grandchildren attending private schools.”

( More )

Some Nebraska State Senators don’t care about helping kids, along with their parents


Some State Senators in my home state of Nebraska it would appear do not care about helping poor kids in failing public schools. A bill which would allow publicly funded charter schools in the state is going down to defeat. The reason is some senators are so committed to the public schools they are not willing to help poor kids who stuck in failing schools.

Even after a school charter school advocate Clarice Jackson told lawmakers about battling to find someone to teach her daughter at a young age. She only succeeded only by taking her child out of the public schools. Today her daughter works at a group home.

Jackson argued before the leaders in Nebraska that other parents in North Omaha parents need the choice that charter schools could bring. 

  She asked. What do you say to a parent who child is failing in school. How long do we wait for you all to figure it out.”

   Isn’t wrong that leaders like President Obama who is against school choice sent his daughters to a private school. I don’t falt him for that. You should do what is best for your child no matter if you are the President of the USA, or working a 9 to five job. I do falt Obama, and others on the left for not giving that same choice to other parents.

The bill in Nebraska it looks like will be defeated in committee. Three on the committee oppose it, and one is skeptical. How wrong, and how sad. Thanks State Senators.