Category Archives: MAD story (MAD-Make A. Difference Story

The case for Christ

Audio

Mickey Mantle New York baseball star gave his life to Christ on his death bed

The following is an excerpt from Richardson’s 2012 book, “Impact Player,” where he details the final conversation he had with Mantle, just days before Mickey passed on.

On the plane, as I realized this likely would be my final visit with Mickey, I prayed for my teammate’s life.

We arrived in Dallas that night. First thing the next morning, I headed to the hospital. I didn’t know what to expect as I pushed open the door.

Mickey flashed his down-home, country-boy smile.

“I can’t wait to tell you this,” Mantle said right away. “I want you to know that I’m a Christian. I’ve accepted Christ as my Savior.”

( Read the rest of this powerful story. )

Glen Campbell is in heaven, Barbara Cook we don’t know about. Where are you going ?

TWO FRIENDS OF MINE DIED ON TUESDAY. GLEN CAMPBELL WAS AN AMAZING MAN. STILL IS, BECAUSE HE IS IN HEAVEN WITH THE LORD HE KNEW. GLEN SPOKE AT OUR MEDIA DINNER IN WASHINGTON A FEW YEARS AGO. HE WAS OPEN AND HONEST ABOUT HIS STRUGGLES WITH ALCOHOL AND DRUGS BEFORE THE LORD SAVED HIM. HIS WIFE, KIM, IS A RADIANT BELIEVER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN HIS COMING TO CHRIST. MANY OF GLEN’S SONGS HAVE BECOME CLASSICS IN COUNTRY WESTERN AND POP MUSIC.

( Read the rest of the above commentary here or listen to the audio.)

50 years ago her life was changed

Fifty years ago, everything changed for her. For the Colson Center, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

On the same weekend in 2012 that Chuck Colson fell ill and ultimately went home to the be with the Lord, we recognized Joni Eareckson Tada as a modern-day William Wilberforce.

And recently, in an interview with Christianity Today, Joni looked back on fifty years since a diving accident left her bound to a wheelchair, recalling how she discovered a depth of trust in Christ she never knew before, and embraced the higher priorities of God than just healing our bodies.

In the decades since her accident, Joni has created and has led one of the most effective ministries on behalf of those with disabilities. She’s helped draft historic legislation, opened hearts and minds, and inspired millions with her painting and singing.

She’s also become a fierce opponent of the culture of death, fighting assisted suicide and euthanasia, which devalue and destroy lives made in God’s image. Thank God for Joni Eareckson Tada, and may she continue to prove His power is made perfect in our weakness.

Believing What We Want

Listen to an old , but good radio sermon,here.

The right way to parent a child who has made a mistake

See the post.

Margaret Bergmann Lambert, Jewish Athlete Excluded From Berlin Olympics, Dies at 103

Read the story.

 

 

 

Forgiving a drug dealer who helped to kill your child

The opioid epidemic is delivering tragedy and pain to families across the country. Here’s how one such family has responded in Christ.

On January 30, 2016, Ashlynn Bailey, a twenty-year-old from Pelham, Alabama, died from a drug overdose.

As John and I have said on BreakPoint many times, America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic—one that kills more people every year than the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 90s.

This means that thousands of families endure the kind of anguish and pain that Bailey’s parents have gone through.

Yet, in the midst of their pain, Bailey’s family reminded us of the difference faith can make, even when the world has ceased making sense.

In the aftermath of her death, her parents established the Ashlynn Bailey Foundation, whose mission is to help addicts and their families. Part of that assistance is sharing their own story.

Ashlynn Bailey grew up in a Christian home. She “grew up in the church, learned about God, and became a Christian at an early age.” Sadly, as many Christian parents know from painful experience, this isn’t always enough.

Bailey began experimenting with drugs in high school and within a few years was using heroin. On January 30, 2016, she bought what she believed was heroin from a dealer in Birmingham.

Instead it was fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine, and which is often mixed with heroin. It is so potent that a policeman in East Liverpool, Ohio, accidentally overdosed after brushing fentanyl residue off his uniform following a drug bust.

Federal prosecutors charged the dealer who sold Bailey the drugs that killed her, Rodrigus Lee Pearson, with a series of drug-related offenses, and were able to increase his sentence because of the link between his actions and Bailey’s death.

At Pearson’s sentencing hearing, Mike Bailey, Ashlynn’s father, approached Pearson, and offered him his hand. He told Pearson “We extend forgiveness to you for the wrongs against our family in the same way that Christ has forgiven our wrongs, even without asking for that forgiveness.”

Afterwards, he told reporters that “I think [Pearson] needs to be held accountable . . . But I don’t want him to feel any less of a person in God’s eyes.”

He added, “I hate drugs, I hate the effects of drugs, I hate the pain that they bring, I hate how it affects families . . . It’s one of the largest demonic forces in our nation right now, just sent to break a family apart. I hate all that, but I don’t hate the individuals.”

The pain that Mike Bailey and his family are feeling is unimaginable for nearly all of us. But the grace they have demonstrated should no t be. It is what is expected of those who have experienced grace in their own lives.

“Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us,” Jesus taught us to pray. The Apostle Paul urged us in Ephesians chapter 4 to “Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”

This forgiveness is not optional.

That’s not to say it’s easy. It’s a work of the Holy Spirit.

It’s also the most powerful Christian witness imaginable. While there are many counter-arguments, some better than others, against specific Christian ideas, there is no argument against the kind of grace and mercy Mike Bailey displayed. It’s a reminder of what sets Christianity apart.

As I said, I can’t imagine the pain the Bailey family is feeling. But I can thank them for reminding us that the light of grace shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it.

Forgiveness is Not Excusing

Listen to a commentary,here.

When the Umpire is wrong, or an authority makes a mistake ( thought on the Bible for children )

Listen to a thought on the Bible for children right here. Or read it below.

Boys, and girls do you have a hard time honoring authorities in your life ?
Hi: Uncle Billy here.Children, and young people has something like this ever happened to you.
“Folks you are listening to the Little League World Series. Bobby Smith is the fastest 11 year old boy to ever play ball. He is on third base with his team down by one run here in the last inning. There are two outs. Just one more out, and this game is over with. Here is the pitch. It is hit to the outfield. The battler is safe at first base. Here is the throw to home plate. It looks to me like Robert will be safe. Believe it, or not the umpire has called him out to end the game.”
Later that night Bobby tells his dad he knew he was safe.
What should young Robert do boys, and girls ? What about you ? How do you act when your teacher gives you a bad grade, when you think you deserved a better mark. What if your parents are wrong in punishing you. Or they were right to punish you, but they did it in a harsh way.
Well the Bible tells us in Romans 13 all authority has been established by the Lord. That would include your parents, teachers, and even umpires.
So how should we act when a leader may have made a mistake.
First off we should pray for the right attitude. The Bible commands us to respect those in authority even when they might be wrong. At times it might be proper to talk to the leader, but we must do it in the right spirit.
Second pray if the leader is wrong the Lord will show him, or her. God throughout the Bible changed people, and he is still in the business of doing that today.
Third we should ask God what he wants to teach us through what this overseer has done. Even if the leader was wrong God can still use it to help us grow closer to him.
Last of all we should remember boys, and girls no one is perfect. Children are not perfect, and adults including those who have authority over us are not perfect. The only one who is perfect is the Savior Jesus who loves adults, and young people. That is a thought on the Bible for children. Until next time, I’m Uncle Billy

All Rights Reserved, 2017
This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.