Category Archives: evil act

Christianity Today made a big mistake in giving pro death soul a platform

I’ll see your quote and raise you two. For the Colson Center, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

I’m surprised, to put it mildly, that Christianity Today would choose to run an opinion piece on health care by Virginia Senator and former Clinton running mate Tim Kaine.

In the article, entitled “We Need All Parts of the Body to Fix Health Care,” Kaine quotes Scripture at us twice, first 1 Corinthians 12, strangely redirecting Paul’s teaching about the church and applying it to Congress.

Even worse, Senator Kaine then cites Matthew 25, about “the least of these.” Well, perhaps Senator Kaine could expand his definition of “the least of these” to include the unborn? Kaine identifies as a Roman Catholic, but has a 100 percent Planned Parenthood voting record in the Senate—100 percent.

I can’t imagine CT would share their platform with someone so morally compromised on other issues. So why the exception for, of all things, abortion?

Look, Senator, here are two other Scripture passages: Matthew 19: “Let the little children come to me;” and Proverbs 6, “God hates hands that shed innocent blood.”

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State Senator who wanted President Trump killed is removed from duties ( thank God, and thank goodness )

Here is the story.

An American news show honors a nation for ending Down syndrome by killing

One Scandinavian country’s treatment of the vulnerable is a barometer for where the rest of the world is headed.

While the nation was cringing last week and every media outlet buzzing about the neo-Nazi imagery from Charlottesville, another story reminiscent of the Third Reich emerged from, of all places, Iceland.

CBS tweeted out the story with the tagline: “Iceland is on pace to virtually eliminate Down syndrome through abortion.”

“With the rise of prenatal screening tests across Europe and the United States,” read the report, “the number of babies born with Down syndrome has significantly decreased, but few countries have come as close to eradicating Down syndrome births as Iceland.”

More than a few people found the tone of the article and its headline…celebratory. Among them was actress Patricia Heaton, whom you may remember as Deborah from “Everybody Loves Raymond.” Heaton blasted CBS for the headline and the story, pointing out that “Iceland isn’t actually eliminating Down syndrome. They’re just killing everybody that has it. Big difference.”

Amen. Of course, as CBS goes on to admit, “Many people born with Down syndrome can live full, healthy lives, with an average lifespan of around 60 years.”

That’s not the half of it, actually. Research published in 2011 in the American Journal of Medical Genetics found that 99 percent of individuals with Down syndrome report being happy, 94 percent of their siblings express pride in their brother or sister with Down syndrome, and just 4 percent of parents regretted their decision to keep their child.

This is important for one simple reason: The entire argument for aborting children diagnosed in utero with Down syndrome is based on quality of life. It’s not a medical concern.

Such children, goes the argument, are an unwelcome burden on their parents or on society, and in the end, will live unhappy lives. So, “it will be better for them,” we are told.

But if you or a friend has someone with Down syndrome in the family, you know nothing could be further from the truth! Those with “Downs” are often the most joyful and loving people you meet.

Even more horrifying, Iceland is a small country, but other larger nations aren’t lagging far behind in this eugenics experiment. In Denmark, 98 percent of children diagnosed with Down syndrome in the womb are killed. In France, it’s 77 percent. And in the U. S. it’s a shameful 67 percent.

When asked why such high percentages of babies with Down syndrome are aborted, Icelandic geneticist Kari Stefansson admitted it wasn’t for medical reasons. Rather, it’s due to “heavy-handed genetic counseling,” or pressure by authority figures to abort.

One pregnancy counselor in Iceland told CBS, “We don’t look at abortion as a murder…We ended a possible life that may have had a huge complication…preventing suffering for the child and for the family.” Or in other words, trust us, “it’s for your own good…”

Tell that to Thordis Ingadottir and her beautiful seven-year-old daughter, Augusta, one of the few people in Iceland with Down syndrome who hasn’t been killed. The pair have become crusaders for those with disabilities, so that they will be “fully integrated on [their] own terms” into society. After all, asks her mom, “What kind of society do you want to live in?”

That’s a good question, as prenatal screening becomes more widely available, and much of the world grapples with this new breed of eugenics. Make no mistake—what we’re witnessing here is the systematic extermination of children who are, by society’s standards, less than perfect. It’s worth remembering that the first groups killed by the Nazis in their quest for perfection by eugenics were those with disabilities.

Will ours be a similar society, in which we claim to eliminate disabilities by eliminating those who have them? It’s up to you and me to decide.

Marijuana devastated Colorado, don’t legalize it nationally

Read the column.

Charlie Gard must never be forgotten

Listen to a spot-on commentary by Cal Thomas. Or read part of it below.

CHARLIE GARD, THE 11-MONTH-OLD BRITISH BABY WITH A RARE GENETIC DISEASE, MUST NEVER BE FORGOTTEN. THAT’S BECAUSE CHARLIE SERVES AS A LESSON FOR WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE STATE ASSUMES THE POWER TO DECIDE WHO IS FIT TO LIVE AND WHO MUST DIE.

DESPITE A HEROIC BATTLE BY HIS PARENTS, THE NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE WOULD NOT LET CHARLIE COME TO AMERICA FOR SPECIALIZED TREATMENT. THE STATE DETERMINED HE WASN’T WORTH IT. THE STATE ALSO REFUSED HIS PARENTS’ REQUEST TO TAKE HIM HOME AND LET HIM DIE THERE. ITS “COMPROMISE” WAS TO LET HIM DIE IN HOSPICE.

THIS SHOULD BE A LESSON TO AMERICANS WHO THINK THE STATE SHOULD RUN HEALTH CARE HERE. WOULD YOU LIKE A GOVERNMENT PANEL DETERMINING YOUR WORTH, BASED ON WHETHER YOU ARE COSTING MORE THAN THE TAXES YOU PAY? WOULD YOU BE OK WITH A BOARD – OK, A DEATH PANEL – DETERMINING YOUR FITNESS TO BE TREATED AND LIVE BY PEOPLE WHO HAVE NEVER EXAMINED YOU?
( Read the rest of this commentary right here. )

Forgiving a drug dealer who helped to kill your child

The opioid epidemic is delivering tragedy and pain to families across the country. Here’s how one such family has responded in Christ.

On January 30, 2016, Ashlynn Bailey, a twenty-year-old from Pelham, Alabama, died from a drug overdose.

As John and I have said on BreakPoint many times, America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic—one that kills more people every year than the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 90s.

This means that thousands of families endure the kind of anguish and pain that Bailey’s parents have gone through.

Yet, in the midst of their pain, Bailey’s family reminded us of the difference faith can make, even when the world has ceased making sense.

In the aftermath of her death, her parents established the Ashlynn Bailey Foundation, whose mission is to help addicts and their families. Part of that assistance is sharing their own story.

Ashlynn Bailey grew up in a Christian home. She “grew up in the church, learned about God, and became a Christian at an early age.” Sadly, as many Christian parents know from painful experience, this isn’t always enough.

Bailey began experimenting with drugs in high school and within a few years was using heroin. On January 30, 2016, she bought what she believed was heroin from a dealer in Birmingham.

Instead it was fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine, and which is often mixed with heroin. It is so potent that a policeman in East Liverpool, Ohio, accidentally overdosed after brushing fentanyl residue off his uniform following a drug bust.

Federal prosecutors charged the dealer who sold Bailey the drugs that killed her, Rodrigus Lee Pearson, with a series of drug-related offenses, and were able to increase his sentence because of the link between his actions and Bailey’s death.

At Pearson’s sentencing hearing, Mike Bailey, Ashlynn’s father, approached Pearson, and offered him his hand. He told Pearson “We extend forgiveness to you for the wrongs against our family in the same way that Christ has forgiven our wrongs, even without asking for that forgiveness.”

Afterwards, he told reporters that “I think [Pearson] needs to be held accountable . . . But I don’t want him to feel any less of a person in God’s eyes.”

He added, “I hate drugs, I hate the effects of drugs, I hate the pain that they bring, I hate how it affects families . . . It’s one of the largest demonic forces in our nation right now, just sent to break a family apart. I hate all that, but I don’t hate the individuals.”

The pain that Mike Bailey and his family are feeling is unimaginable for nearly all of us. But the grace they have demonstrated should no t be. It is what is expected of those who have experienced grace in their own lives.

“Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us,” Jesus taught us to pray. The Apostle Paul urged us in Ephesians chapter 4 to “Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”

This forgiveness is not optional.

That’s not to say it’s easy. It’s a work of the Holy Spirit.

It’s also the most powerful Christian witness imaginable. While there are many counter-arguments, some better than others, against specific Christian ideas, there is no argument against the kind of grace and mercy Mike Bailey displayed. It’s a reminder of what sets Christianity apart.

As I said, I can’t imagine the pain the Bailey family is feeling. But I can thank them for reminding us that the light of grace shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it.

Charles was wrong on little Charlie

The more I read, and watch Charles Krauthammer the more I struggle if he is truly on the right.
In a recent column Charles kind of stood behind the system in the UK which kept the parents of that little boy Charlie Gard from bringing him to America. Little Charlie died yesterday, and from what I heard the British hospital he was in would not even let his mommy, and daddy take him home to die at their home. Talk about evil, and mean.
The issue in Gard case was not that the tax payers of England having to pay for treatment here in America. The parents had raised money to pay for the treatment themselves.
Krauthammer in his column seem to accept the idea that the courts, and doctors of the U.K. knew what was best.
That is not even the issue. The issue is should they decide if little Charlie was brought to America. Don’t parents have the right to decide about healthcare for their children. Unless there is abuse involved.
Krauthammer writes in his column sometimes parents are wrong. I agree, but what about judges, and doctors. They are not perfect either. But this again should not be about who was right, or who knows what is best for the child. This should have been about who has the right to decide.
When you give a government control of healthcare as has happened in England this kind of issue may happen. Are you listening parents of America. This is another reason us in America needs to get Obamacare off the books. Too bad the Democrats in the Senate along with three GOP senators has made this kind of thing a possibility here in America.

Parents’ loss in UK highlights need in U.S.

Here is the story.

Same sex couple was mean

Awhile back a column writer for my local paper wrote a story on a same sex couple who have two children. The couple is married. So were the children from bad homes who the couple took in ? Nope they hatched with the help of an anonymous sperm donor.
Now I don’t believe same sex couples should be foster parents, or be able to adopt kids. However even if you do, don’t you agree it is cruel to create a child who in this case will just have two mothers. It is hard enough growing up today with so many parents getting a divorce. The truth is children do better in a home where there is a mother, and father. Can children make it when the odds don’t favor them. Yes, they can at times because of hard work along with the grace of God. Other times it is just the grace of God which keeps young people going the right way.
I find it to be child abuse to produce a child who will be born to a same sex couple.
The couple the column writer  wrote about,this year took their children to the Chicago Pride Parade. Those poor kids. They should let them be kids. No way should they had been produced to make this couple happy. We should think of what is best for the children. What this couple along with those who helped them did was cruel, and yes child abuse. However in our PC culture I am sure souls like me will get the label as mean. Still truth doesn’t change just because everyone doesn’t embrace it.

UK government is not little Charlie’s mommy, or daddy ( sure you want this kind of healthcare system here in America )

Little Charlie

Anyone looking for another reason not to leave life-and-death issues to the state need look no further than the conflict between the British government and the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard.

Governments, including the British courts and the European court of human rights have refused to allow Charlie’s parents to take him to the U.S. for what they believe is life-saving treatment. In what many will regard as a cynical decision, UK judge Nicholas Francis gave Charlie’s parents just two days to present new evidence as to why their son should receive experimental treatment. A final decision will be handed down in a hearing on Thursday.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital where Charlie is on a ventilator, his brain reportedly damaged from a rare genetic condition, argue that he should be removed from life support and allowed to die. President Trump has offered help. Pope Francis also supports the parent’s right to determine what is best for their child.

Charlie’s parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, believe an experimental treatment known as nucleoside therapy might work on their son. British doctors say it won’t improve the child’s “quality of life.” They want him to die. Apparently that’s OK with the state-run National Health Service (NHS), which is always looking for ways to cut costs.

The parents have raised enough money to take Charlie to America for treatment. Wouldn’t most parents do all they could for their child, especially one so young who is helpless and at the mercy of adults? I know I would for my grandson, who is also named Charlie.

( Read the rest of this spot on column by Cal Thomas. )