Category Archives: good deeds

Town puts on graduation ceremony, and wedding in one day, for sick doctor 

Read the story.

After death of leader,school community mobilizes 

Read the story.

Do acts of kindness,starting on  Easter Sunday,( it can be simple things )

Read the story right here.

Thanking a teacher ( we should all do it ) 

So have you ever thanked one of your teachers? Here is a column by somebody who did thank one. 

Teacher looks at potential, not the sinful/youthful act some teens did to her: 

Recently three high school teens in my city gave their teacher frosting which was mixed with their own semen. All three of the freshman planned the act, but only two went through with it.  The court handled out the punishment for two of the teens this week. The 15 year old boys must complete 40 hours of community service within five months and write apology letters to the teacher within 10 days. 

The teens must take decision-making and victim empathy courses, attend counseling and be involved in a social activity or hold a part-time job. They are also required to live with their parents, and follow all their rules.

What I found really amazing is the attitude of the teacher who was the victim. She told a probation officer that her concern was for the young men. The teacher said she desired them to move on and live successful lives. She didn’t want them to be scarred and wants them to move forward and realize their potential. 

  What a great attitude this teacher has. Part of me thinks these boys should be caned, but it is very cool somebody is not looking at the sinful -youthful act they did, but at what they can become. Good for her. Lets wish her, and these teens the best.

( Source Omaha.com Facebook page)

That is life’s trophy

Professional tennis star-a nun. What? Sounds like two different stories doesn’t it? In this case, it’s the same life story. Andrea Jaeger first picked up a tennis racket at the age of eight. By 14, she was a tennis pro. Soon she was challenging tennis greats like Chris Evert and Tracy Austin; she was ranked number two in the world. Then came a serious shoulder injury that required seven surgeries and she was forced to retire. She took her prize money, she moved to Colorado, and started a charitable foundation that helps sick, abused, and at-risk children. So she became an Episcopal nun, and she was actually burying her life in a ministry to needy children. According to USA Today, after her injury she was told, “Your life’s over. You’ve failed. You’ll never amount to anything.” Oh, were they wrong. The article on her new life concluded this way: “Her name will never be etched on Grand Slam hardware, but she can live with that. ‘It’s like I have kids’ names in my heart,’ and she says, ‘That is life’s trophy.'”( Read more )

Christians Don’t Retire from Kingdom Work

( Listen to the Breakpoint radio commentary from yesterday here, or read it below. )
Narrowly escaping the jaws of a large reptile might get you thinking about your life. But you don’t have to wait ‘til then to make important changes.
C. S. Lewis wrote that pain is God’s megaphone—something He uses when He can’t get our attention any other way. I know at least one Christian who has an idea of what that’s like: God got his attention after—and I’m not making this up—he was nearly eaten by a crocodile.
Bill Beattie was a businessman whose life was going quite well. He’d been happily married for 35 years, and his three children were leading productive lives. He expected to spend the years ahead peacefully serving as an elder in his church in Danbury, Connecticut.
But God was prompting Bill toward other things. Problem was, Bill wasn’t listening. That changed after a canoeing adventure on the Zambezi River, home to hippos and crocodiles, during an anniversary trip to Africa with his wife Kathie. Bill recalls, “I was a novice canoeist and had foolishly rejected Kathie’s suggestion of canoeing lessons prior to the trip.” The guide gave them a five-minute training session, and sent the couple paddling away, headed downstream. They were “eyeball-to eyeball with hippos at every turn,” Bill recalls. The expression on Kathie’s face told him that his wife was terrified.
And she was right to be. They suddenly struck a submerged tree trunk and capsized the canoe. The rescue team quickly picked up Kathie, but their canoe could not hold another person. Bill tried to right his own canoe and climb on top of it as the crocodiles watched.
Struggling with his canoe, Bill didn’t notice, but his companions did, that a 13-foot crocodile came within 10 feet of him before turning and pursuing some of the flotsam from the canoe that had gone floating down the river.
Around the campfire that evening, Bill reflected on what had happened that day. It was extraordinary, he says, “that the croc did not attack and drag me to the bottom. I sensed that God had intervened on my behalf to save me for His purposes.”
Back home, Bill began to consider his areas of strength, and consulted with friends. Believing God was leading him to start a ministry for at risk, inner-city boys, he founded the Pathways Danbury, a mentoring ministry which now reaches girls as well. Christian adults provide them with one-on-one mentoring, Bible study, and tutoring. They can attend Bible camp in the summer, and if they graduate from high school meeting standards of excellence, they’re given a $10,000 grant for education, business, or housing. Some 70 boys and girls are now involved in the Pathways Danbury mentoring program, which was expanded in 2008 to include Pathways Academy Middle School and the “Say Yes” after-school program.
The key to their ministry, Bill notes, “continues to be sharing Jesus on a long-term basis to kids who are at risk for drugs and alcohol . . . delinquency and family instability.”
Now frequently on BreakPoint, we like to share stories of Christians like Bill who are making a difference in the world by tackling the brokenness in their own backyard. We do this to remind us that all is not lost… that God has his people everywhere, enlisting them in his Kingdom work to make all things new, like Bill in Danbury, Connecticut. And if God is at work there, He’s at work around you too.
Bill’s story also reminds me how much Chuck Colson hated the idea that retirement is about spending the rest of your life on the golf course. He would have none of that. Christians don’t retire from Kingdom work, he’d often say. Bill’s story was told in a manual for the Halftime Institute, which offers resources to help believers intentionally aim the second half of their lives at serving Jesus. We’ll link you to it at BreakPoint.org.
But there’s no need to wait until you’re nearing retirement: God has placed you where He has for a purpose right now. And if you’d like to lock in on a life plan for Kingdom work, the Colson Fellows program will prepare you for that. Study with great worldview teachers, and join motivated fellow believers for an intense and intensely rewarding nine months of worldview teaching and preparation to engage the culture around you. Just visit ColsonFellows.org for more information.

Danger keeps Omaha , Nebraska doctor from treating patients in South Sudan. Instead, he’ll treat them in Uganda

Today, Joseph Dumba, an Omaha family practitioner with an incredible back story, will begin his annual medical mission trip to Africa — his 11th.
But instead of going to his native South Sudan, where he has established a clinic that is funded in part by Omahans, Dr. Dumba will be in neighboring Uganda.
This year, it is simply too dangerous and difficult to go to South Sudan, where famine has added to the misery of civil war. Plus, many of the South Sudanese people who need Dr. Dumba’s care aren’t there anyway.
( More )

The Power of love, and words:

My wife was just a little girl when she first met Bob Henley. He was one of those older men you look up at and look up to at church. She had a visit to her childhood church some years ago, and she asked about Mr. Henley. They said, “He’s 92 years old – and that he would be there the next week.” My wife made it a point to attend church there the following week and to reconnect with this memory from her past. As they were talking, Mr. Henley said, “You probably don’t remember this (and she didn’t), but one day after church you came up to me and you grabbed this finger. You were only about this high (about the altitude of a 4-year old). But you grabbed my finger and you said, ‘Mr. Henley, I love you.'” Now why would he remember that little¬ childlike expression into the 9th decade of his life? He said, “You don’t know this, but I was raised an orphan. That morning was the first time in my life anyone ever said ‘I love you’ to me.'” Wow!
I’m Ron Hutchcraft and I want to have A Word With You today about “Leaving Love Behind.”
All those years without anyone ever telling him they loved him. And the power of someone finally letting him know he was loved.
We’re surrounded by people who don’t know they’re loved…or who have not been told nearly enough. It’s a lonely world of self-focused people. Consequently, you can almost assume that some of the people you know are love-starved. And a lot of the mistakes they are making is because they’re looking for love in all the wrong places. Can you see that need behind their deeds?
Our word for today from the Word of God comes from Ephesians 5:1. It becomes a summons to action for us in our love-starved world. Here’s what it says, “Be imitators· of God, therefore, as dearly loved children…and live a life of love, just as Christ loved us and gave Himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.” Did you get that…”live a life of love”? Here that love is illustrated with the love of Jesus for us; love that is willing to “give yourself up”…to sacrifice; to go out of your way to put someone else first.
I wonder how much of an answer you are to the deep love deficit that people around you are feeling. It isn’t enough that you love them. You have to let them know you love them. A lot of children aren’t feeling secure in their parents’ love, not because mom and dad don’t love them, but because they don’t express their love in ways that the child can feel.
Like that man at Karen’s church, people need to be told they’re loved. They need someone who makes them feel important by just patiently listening to them. You say “I love you” when you show up at the funeral, at the hospital, when you celebrate their special moments with them. You say, “I love you” when you drop what you’re doing to be with that person. You say “I love you” when you hang in there with them when they’re aggravating, frustrating, obnoxious, unlovable. When they’re the least lovable, they need your love the most.
For some of us, this expressive love doesn’t come naturally because we were raised in an undemonstrative family…we’ve been conditioned to not let our feelings show. But that emotional paralysis cripples you and it deprives the people around you of knowing how you care for them. God’s in the business of liberating people emotionally who say, “Lord please unleash Your love… Your love through me.”
It’s important to look around the circle of people in your life and ask, “Does he…does she feel loved by me?” We’re called by God to live a life of love. For, as my wife was reminded by a man in his 90s, your simple, honest expression of love may be one of the first that person has had in a long time, and it is something they will never forget.

Hero Who Saved 669 Children During The Holocaust Has No Idea He’s Surrounded By Them On TV Show

Read the story.