Category Archives: Good news

Folks go over the edge to help kids ,and the Youth for Christ ministry

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California Judge Tosses Most Charges Against CMP Journalists Over Exposing Planned Parenthood

Here is some good news in the battle for life.

Grade school along with middle school kids working together to save bats

Middle school students don’t usually mix with elementary kids – especially in the summer. The recipe works for this group of 8 as they hike the grounds at Arrowhead Park in Neola, Iowa.

The subject that has brought the 8th graders and 4th graders together is bats.

“The one we are researching is called the little brown bat,” said Michael Denning.

“It was cool, but kind of creepy,” said Brant Freeberg.

“There’s nothing cute about them at all,” said Olivia Matson.

“[The bats] get themselves under the loose bark,” said Olivia Matson. “And then they follow the path of the sun as the day goes on to keep warm.”

The park ranger told the youngsters about a problem.

“White Nose Syndrome is a fungus that grows on bat’s noses and on their wings and they can’t fly to get water,” said Brant Freeberg. “And they die.”

In spite of the creepiness, the students understood the importance of a bat.
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Young girl kidnapped by ISIS three years ago reunited with family

Read this amazing answer to prayer by clicking here.

Saved by an Atheist

( Here is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. Read it below. )

Find out how a famous atheist started a secular humanist on the road to faith in Jesus Christ.

Sarah Irving-Stonebraker was on the fast track to academic stardom. A native of Australia, Sarah had won the University Medal and a Commonwealth Scholarship to undertake her Ph.D. in History at King’s College, Cambridge.

Sarah’s secular humanist perspective fit right in at King’s, and her views of Christians—that they were anti-intellectual and self-righteous—seemingly were confirmed.

Yet, as she details in an eye-opening testimony from the Veritas Forum, a strange thing happened to Sarah inside her secular bubble. Somehow, the truth got in. After Cambridge, Sarah said she attended some lectures at Oxford by the atheist public intellectual and Princeton ethics professor Peter Singer.

Singer, as you probably know, has stirred worldwide controversy by advancing the notion that some forms of animal life have more worth than some human life. Singer doesn’t believe in God, and therefore he sees no basis for any intrinsic human dignity.

During the Oxford lectures, Singer asserted that nature provides no grounds for human equality, pointing to children who have lost their ability to reason through disability or illness. Sarah Irving-Stonebraker’s comfortable secularism was suddenly rocked.

“I remember leaving Singer’s lectures with a strange intellectual vertigo,” Sarah writes. “I began to realise that the implications of my atheism were incompatible with almost every value I held dear.”

A few months later, at a dinner for the International Society for the Study of Science and Religion, Andrew Briggs, a Professor of Nanomaterials and a Christian, asked Sarah a perfectly reasonable question: Do you believe in God? Again, Sarah was flummoxed, fumbling something about agnosticism. Briggs replied, “Do you really want to sit on the fence forever?”

“That question,” she now says, “made me realise that if issues about human value and ethics mattered to me, the response that perhaps there was a God, or perhaps there wasn’t, was unsatisfactory.”

Fast forward to Florida, where Sarah was conducting research. She began attending church as a seeker: And she was overwhelmed by Christians living out their faith: “feeding the homeless every week, running community centres, and housing and advocating for migrant farm laborers.”

And when she started reading the likes of Paul Tillich and Reinhold Niebuhr, she saw the intellectual depth and profundity of their Christian faith. Then this: “A friend gave me C.S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity, and one night,” she wrote, “I knelt in my closet in my apartment and asked Jesus to save me, and to become the Lord of my life.”

Sarah’s journey from doubt to faith—which you can read in full by coming to our website and clicking on this commentary—reminds me a little of another formerly atheist denizen of Cambridge and Oxford—C.S. Lewis. Lewis saw the bleak implications of his worldview, stating, “Nearly all I loved I believed to be imaginary; nearly all that I believed to be real, I thought grim and meaningless.” And just like Sarah, Lewis had good, well-informed Christian friends and colleagues such as J.R.R. Tolkien to point a disillusioned atheist gently to Christ.

As Chuck Colson would say, while there are many good ways to share the good news with people, even scholars, one is to help them follow their worldview assumptions to their logical conclusion. The fact is, the grim, atheistic worldview simply can’t carry the weight of human significance on its bony shoulders.

Created in the awesome image of God, men and women know that life has a meaning beyond “eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.” People everywhere see the True, the Beautiful, and the Good and long to know their source. And, thank God, He has revealed Himself!

When Faith Wears Pinstripes

( Billy’s thoughts – Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. )

How about some good news today? Like a story about a humble, likeable and rising baseball star.

 

As a lifelong New York Mets fan, it kind of pains me to say this, but the athlete who has taken the Big Apple by storm is wearing black pinstripes, not blue ones.

His name is Aaron Judge, and almost every piece you read about him not only tells readers about how extraordinary Judge is on the field, but also how extraordinary he is off the field.

You can probably guess where this story is heading, but first let me tell you about Aaron Judge the player.

Judge is a big deal. I mean that literally. At 6’7” and 280 pounds, he may be the largest man to ever play in the big leagues. As ESPN’s Tim Kurkjian told his ESPN colleague Tony Kornheiser, Judge fills the entire door opening when he passes through it.

Of course, none of this would matter if Judge weren’t good at baseball, and one-third of the way through his rookie season, he has been good, historically-good. In May, he became the first player to hit 13 home runs in his first twenty-five games.

As of this recording, he leads the American League in home runs, is third in runs batted in, and is second in slugging percentage. When you combine his offense with his fielding, he’s been, by most estimates, the second-most valuable player in the American League.

This kind of production on the field is part of the reason Judge and the Yankees are the talk of the town while my Mets are making headlines for having their mascot, Mr. Met, make an obscene gesture at the fans.

The other part is Judge’s character. It’s difficult to read a profile of the Yankees outfielder without coming across words like “humble” and “unselfish.” Former big leaguer and now baseball analyst Eduardo Perez told MLB Radio that he was impressed by Judge’s humility and kindness.

His manager, Joe Girardi, paid him the ultimate compliment when he said “He is a little bit like [Yankee legend Derek] Jeter for me . . . He has a smile all the time. He loves to play the game. You always think he is going to do the right thing on the field and off the field.”

Words like “humble,” “unselfish,” and “do the right thing” raise the specter of what my friend Terry Mattingly calls a “religion ghost.” They should prompt the question “why is Judge humble and unselfish?”

For the answer, look no further than Judge’s Twitter feed. The first words you read are “Christian. Faith, Family, then Baseball.” Scroll down a few tweets and you will read, “Happy Easter to Everyone. He is Risen!”

The nexus between Judge’s faith and family is apparent when you read what he has to say about his parents. He says “I’m blessed.” “My parents are amazing, they’ve taught me so many lessons . . . I honestly can’t thank them enough for what they’ve done for me.’’

“What they’ve done” began with adopting him when he was two days old. “I feel they kind of picked me . . . I feel that God was the one that matched us together.’’

Crushing baseballs, Christian faith, and adoption—not all the news is bad. There are things in our culture that are worth celebrating. You just have to know where to look, and, in my case, overlook the color of the pinstripes.

School Puts Student’s Service Dog In Yearbook, Now Internet Can’t Get Enough Of Their Sweet Story

Here is the story.

I am sorry you can no longer read porn in a Nebraska prison ( good )

The leaders of the Nebraska prison system have decided starting in January that inmates in a Nebraska prison will not be able to read, or look at porn reading material.
Good for them. No one has a right to read porn while in prison. If you like you can read a story about this, right here.