Category Archives: gay rights

The Mormon Church is right on this

Mormon church severs some of its ties to the Boy Scouts

Democrats are against helping gay folks

Read a post from Rev. Franklin Graham.

Transgender or Tomboy?

If your daughter likes boy stuff, watch out.

As the dad of four, I know every child is different. Even boys and girls can vary widely in their interests.

And that’s why I was so disturbed by a recent piece in the New York Times entitled, “My Daughter Is Not Transgender. She’s a Tomboy.”

Lisa Davis writes that because her seven-year-old daughter keeps her hair short, likes “Star Wars,” wears t-shirts, and plays sports, teachers, doctors, and fellow parents continually ask if she’s transgendered.

“Your child wants to be called a boy, right?” they ask. “Or is she a boy that wants to be called a girl?”

“She’s a girl,” Davis always corrects. “Really.”

This is crazy: a girl can’t just be herself without adults trying to give her puberty blockers? Even sadder, the mother, despite her complaints, still pays lip service to the LGBT movement, ready to give her daughter hormone injections if she changes her mind!

Let’s let children be children. We shouldn’t conscript them into our own sexual politics.

UMC clergy demand LGBT ordination

Monday morning, the United Methodist Queer Clergy Caucus (UMQCC) issued a letter to the UMC that presses the denomination to be more inclusive of LGBT members inside the church.

( More )

LGBTQ, transgender issues should be taught in nursery school, UK teachers’ union says

The story is here. By the way if you live in the UK, you might want to give hard thinking to removing your children from the government schools, along with the public nursery schools.

    The rest of us should do what we can to reach young people with the truth, or support those who do. Thank God for Christian ministries that are touching young people with the good news, such as CEF, and Youth for Christ.

Boycott us, will you? NC lawmakers make a stand

The story is here.

LB 173 good, or bad for Nebraska:

On January 10, 2017, Nebraska State Senator Adam Morfeld sponsored LB173. LB173 is a bill that requires that discrimination against people with sexual orientation/gender identification be stopped. LB173 is a revival of other like bills that have died “on the shelf” in the past but this year it appears that LB173 has a very good chance of passing in the Nebraska Unicameral. 
Come and hear Jonathan Alexandre, J.D., present an argument against the passing of LB173. Profit and non-profit organizations alike are in danger of losing their First Amendment rights so that a small percentage of citizens may exercise their new sexual orientation and gender identification.  
He will be speaking at the following Omaha sites on Friday, 4/7/17: 
7:00-8:30a.m. CBMC HEARTLAND Office 1065 No. 115th Street, #100 
11:45a.m.-1:00p.m. GARDEN CAFE AT ROCKBROOK, 11040 Oak 
6:30-8:00p.m. KROC CENTER 2825 Y Street 
Jonathan Alexandre, J.D., will be the new Director of Public Policy for Liberty Counsel and Liberty Counsel Action in Washington. 
Previously, Alexandre was Assistant General Counsel and Public Policy Coordinator for the MFI in Boston. In this role, he provided counsel for MFI’s mission in the legal and legislative arenas to advance the sanctity of life, the dignity of traditional marriage, and religious liberty in the Commonwealth. 
Alexandre earned his undergraduate degree from Ana Maria College in Political Science and Government and received his Juris Doctor from Liberty University School of Law. 
For more information go to www.SaveNebraskaChildren.com

No matter what You Tube decides parents need to know what their kids are doing online, and one gay blogger needs to hit the road Jack

So how restricted is restricted mode? For the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.
Last week YouTube announced they’re reviewing complaints about their “restricted mode,” which allows parents to control the videos their kids watch. The complaints came from lesbian, LGBT-identifying video bloggers who said this mode blocked many of their videos.
One popular blogger said he thinks young children should be able to view his videos about homosexuality. Using the example of a six-year-old finding videos about boys having boyfriends, he said he found it offensive that some parents would find that offensive.

( More )

The gay lifestyle is risking

( Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. ) 
consequences, and bad ideas have victims. False promises of love and personal fulfillment are no exception.
Over a year and-a-half after the Obergefell decision, the debate over gay “marriage” and homosexuality has largely fizzled out: partly because of the election, partly because the “T” in the LGBT acronym has been stealing all the headlines, and partly because Obergefell is now viewed by many as settled law. And that’s a shame, because so-called “progress” isn’t bringing about the rosy picture we were promised.
In what may be the most candid piece in Huffington Post history, Michael Hobbes, who identifies as gay, writes about what he calls an “epidemic of loneliness.”
“For years,” he begins, “I’ve noticed the divergence between my straight friends and my gay friends. While one half of my social circle has disappeared into relationships, kids and suburbs, the other has struggled through isolation and anxiety, hard drugs and risky (behavior).”
Through story after story and mountains of statistics, Hobbes then documents a consistent and chilling trend among those who share his lifestyle. “Gay men everywhere, at every age,” he writes, are two-to-ten-times more likely than heterosexual men to commit suicide.
And that’s just the beginning. Homosexual males also suffer from higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, allergies, asthma, and a whole host of behavior-related infections and dysfunctions. They’re twice as likely to experience major depressive episodes, report having fewer close friends, and abuse drugs at an alarming rate.
In fact, living in so-called “gay neighborhoods” is a predictor of more frequent, risky behaviors and methamphetamine use. And, Hobbes adds, the community itself is brutal and degrading to its members. Smart-phone hookup apps drive a culture of exploitation and casual encounters that one young man he interviewed said made him feel like “a piece of meat.”
We often hear these disastrous statistics and stories attributed to homophobia, bullying, and shame. Having been treated horribly since childhood, men like this author—the oft-repeated myth goes—are forced to live a lie. They’re depressed because they’ve been oppressed and repressed.
But here’s the problem with the bullying hypothesis. In countries like the Netherlands and Sweden where same-sex “marriage” has been the law of the land for years, gay men remain three times more susceptible to mood disorders and three- to ten-times more likely to engage in “suicidal self-harm.”
The situation is so bad that one respondent in a survey of HIV clinics told researchers, “It’s not a question of not knowing how to save their lives. It’s a question of them not knowing if their lives are worth saving.”
Incredibly, after this long and brutal and well-documented description of life in his community, Hobbes then concludes the cause as having minority status, which has taught them to live in fear. At no point does he consider the possibility that it’s the lifestyle itself that may be what’s destroying these men’s lives.
Still, one expert quoted in the piece hints that he knows what’s going on. Christopher Stults, a researcher at New York University, admits that for many people, the marriage decision was a letdown. “We have this legal status, and yet there’s still something unfulfilled.”
Could it be that this lifestyle cuts off this community from the natural family, from children, and—according to years of statistics—from monogamous partnerships? Could it be the disparity Hobbes sees between what he wants and what he got is a result of a broken lifestyle? Could it be that this behavior naturally isolates people? Could it be that God didn’t design His image-bearers to live like this, and when we do, it actually destroys us?
Unfortunately, those questions are no longer even considered by Hobbes or by social scientists. But we as a society, and especially the Church, must consider these questions. As long as there are real people trying to fill their hearts with lies, caring about them will mean having a more open mind than the Huffington Post.

He couldn’t have won the award now named after him!:

Princeton Theological Seminary just reversed the decision to recognize Tim Keller, pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian in Manhattan, for his church-planting and public witness.

( Read, or listen to the rest of this commentary.)