Category Archives: Action Call

BreakPoint: House Passes 20-Week Abortion Ban Time to Make It Law

Congress has a chance right now to end one of the most grisly types of abortion. Pro-lifers, it’s time to get loud.

On Tuesday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 36, the “Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act,” on a vote of 237-189. If enacted, this bill would criminalize abortion after twenty weeks of pregnancy except in cases of rape, incest, and the life of the mother. While it’s similar to laws already in place in a few states, it’s also similar to federal bills that failed in 2013 and 2015.

The crucial difference between then and now, of course, is the Republican president in the White House—one who campaigned on an explicitly pro-life platform and has pledged to sign this bill. That means the only thing now standing between the Pain-Capable act and the president’s desk is the Senate—which is no small hurdle.

Why is this legislation so important? Well, as the name suggests, babies at twenty weeks of gestation have nervous systems developed enough to feel pain. Now, in a consistent pro-life worldview, functional abilities have nothing to do with human dignity, and so all abortions are wrong. But abortions conducted just two or three weeks prior to the current point of viability are particularly and obviously gruesome.

Chances are, you may have met someone who was born prematurely at around 24 weeks. Killing any child should be unthinkable, but just before viability? In fact, former abortionist Dr. Anthony Levatino explains how gruesome second trimester abortions are in a disturbing video for LiveAction. We’ve linked to it at BreakPoint.org, but I’ll tell you this much: It involves literally ripping a baby limb from limb.

On a purely political basis—and contrary to claims by Planned Parenthood and others—this bill is popular on both sides of the political aisle. A 2013 Gallup poll found just 27 percent of Americans think abortion should be legal after the first trimester of pregnancy which, by the way, ends at 12 weeks of gestation.

A Knights of Columbus poll in 2014 found an incredible 84 percent of Americans want to restrict abortion to the first three months of pregnancy or less! And—are you sitting down for this?—62 percent of those who are strongly pro-choice support a 20-week ban. These are folks who support paying for abortions with tax dollars. As Will Saletan at Slate admits, “even most pro-choice people aren’t sold” on killing babies within a hairs breadth of viability.

And this legislation would also moderate America’s extremely liberal federal abortion laws, making them more like those of other Western nations. Now, I’m no fan of modeling America after Europe as some are, but as Cassy Fiano explains in a video for Prager University, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, and France all heavily restrict or effectively ban abortions after the first trimester. Only seven other countries have abortion laws like America, and two of them are North Korea and China.

So, where’s our challenge? CNN reports that GOP Whip Senator John Cornyn of Texas, when asked whether his chamber would take up this legislation, said “That’s not a near-term priority.”

Say what? If ending abortion isn’t the reason pro-lifers vote overwhelmingly Republican, what is? Look, for too long we’ve heard lots of pro-life rhetoric on the GOP campaign trail, only to see the unborn take a backseat to other priorities in Washington.

So it’s time to send a clear message to Cornyn and other Senate Republicans: This is why your constituents elected you. Get busy.

And for Democratic senators, we say, “Look at the poll numbers. Listen to Americans. The majority of your voters—the pro-choice crowd—supports this legislation.” Listen to them, not to Planned Parenthood or the increasingly irrelevant abortion lobby. End this most grisly form of abortion now.

 

Now make no mistake—all abortion should be illegal. But this is a huge step in the right direction. Come to BreakPoint.org and we’ll help you get in touch with your U.S. senators. It’s their job to listen. And it’s our job to speak for those who can’t.

Advertisements

Bring your Bible to school is October 5th

 What book is most needed in our public schools, but least likely to bethere? I bet you can take a guess.

Not all that long ago, Teddy Roosevelt could say without fear of contradiction, “A thorough understanding of the Bible is better than a college education.” In more recent times, Ronald Reagan said, “Of the many influences that have shaped the United States into a distinctive nation and people, none may be said to be more fundamental and enduring than the Bible.”

Now aside from the Christian worldview it teaches and the moral lifestyle it commends, the Bible also tells us how to know and love God and how to love and serve our fellow man. No wonder it was at one time required reading in practically every school in America.

But today, this Book, which laid the foundation for modern science, political freedom, and Western culture, is seen as unacceptable in American education. Yes, politicians in both parties often selectively quote the Bible when it serves their purposes, and educational progressives will, reluctantly, allow the Old and New Testaments to be studied as an academic subject in our public schools.

But since 1963, if there’s even a hint of moral teaching or proselytizing, well, forget it. And yet we wonder aloud where the increasing levels of suicide, sex, and drug abuse in our young people have come from.

That’s why I’m thrilled to tell you about a growing movement to re-introduce the Bible in our public schools—not by teachers or administrators, but by the kids themselves. It’s called Bring Your Bible to School Day, and this year’s event is tomorrow, Thursday, October 5th.

With a tagline of “Bring It. Share It. Live It,” Bring Your Bible to School Day began in 2014 and is sponsored by our friends at Focus on the Family. Last year more than 350,000 young people participated. This year, they expect half a million public school students in all 50 states to bring their Bibles to school and tell their friends about the hope they have. And the best part is, it’s perfectly constitutional.

“Over the years,” says Focus President Jim Daly, “we’ve heard from many kids and teens who want to meaningfully engage in conversations with peers to share their perspective on important issues. The good news is—they can.

Daly adds, “The Constitution recognizes students’ rights to share their biblical viewpoints in a way that doesn’t disturb instruction time, and to exercise their faith at school. ‘Bring Your Bible to School Day’ celebrates these rights and gives Christian students a chance to share a bit about their faith, which is an important part of who they are.”

Indeed. To see what it’s all about, just go to bringyourbible.org for all the details. You’ll see testimonies there of students boldly standing up for Jesus at their schools. There are sections for parents, for pastors, and for teachers, plus vital information on what’s legally permissible. And an awful lot is permissible! As the Supreme Court has noted, “It can hardly be argued that students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech at the schoolhouse gate.”

Look, let’s be honest: a big part of the reason there’s so little Christian influence in our public schools is that, as our friends at Gateways to Better Education have argued for years, people on both sides of the argument simply don’t understand what’s legal and constitutional and what is not. But an even bigger part is because too many of us have become afraid or passive in the face of our culture’s growing unbelief. As Chuck Colson used to say, Christians need to courageously break the spiral of silence. Bring Your Bible to School Day—again, it’s tomorrow—is a great way do just that, winsomely, and completely legally.

 

For you and your children to learn more about how they can take important early steps in standing up for Jesus with their friends, visit bringyourbible.org. It has all the resources you’ll need to be a part of this superb movement.

 

You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught ( something a Coach of third grader football players should have done )

Just a couple weekends ago in Belleville, Illinois, every single player on a football team of youngsters—eight years old and under—took a knee during the national anthem.

The coach, Orlando Goodin, said his kids knew all about why people were protesting in the streets of St. Louis over the acquittal of former police officer Jason Stockley. He saw a teaching opportunity—and explained Colin Kaepernick’s decision to kneel during the national anthem. The kids asked if they could do the same.

So, sure enough, when the national anthem played, these third graders immediately took a knee, their backs turned away from the flag.

 

There’s a line from the old musical South Pacific that says, “You’ve got to be carefully taught.”

(Billy’s thoughts –  Read the rest this spot-on commentary, or listen to it by clicking here.)

“What Are You Willing To Do”

Listen to a short commentary about the church of Jesus Christ in the Middle-East.

A Message for the NFL, and some of her players

What does it really mean to make America great, again

Make America Great Again. It’s the mantra that’s become ingrained in the nationfal consciousness over the last two years, both embraced and scorned by millions.
We spoke with George Durance of TeachBeyond, who explained how to Christians, the phrase should involve something much deeper than politics.
( More )

Happy Labor Day from the late Chuck Colson

Happy Labor Day! As you enjoy your day off from work, let’s hear what Chuck Colson had to think about the dignity of work.

Eric Metaxas: Do we work to live, or live to work? I’d imagine that most of us would say we work to live: to pay the bills and support ourselves and our families. Many of us would admit that we work for the weekend—so we can do the things we really like to do, like take vacations, enjoy our hobbies and spend time with friends and family.

But I can almost hear Chuck Colson saying, “Hold on a minute, work is a gift from God.”

For Chuck Colson work was as much a part of life as breathing. From the Marine Corps to his law practice, from Capitol Hill to the Nixon White House, and especially ministering in the prisons and teaching Christian worldview, Chuck was a tireless, passionate worker for God and the causes he believed in so deeply.

In fact, although he was a few decades older than most of us on his staff, there were times we simply couldn’t keep up. This was a man, after all, who would show up at the office after the weekend and say, “Thank God it’s Monday!” And long after many men his age had retired, Chuck vowed he would work til the day he died. And for all intents and purposes, that’s exactly what he did.

So this Labor Day, I thought it would be good to hear from Chuck on his view of work itself. Here he is now, from a BreakPoint commentary called “Working Class Heroes,” which aired back in 2002.

Chuck: I for one am happy to join the celebration of working-class heroes, especially today. Christians have a special reason to celebrate Labor Day, which honors the fundamental dignity of workers, for we worship a God Who labored to make the world, and Who created human beings in His image to be workers. When God made Adam and Eve, He gave them work to do: cultivating and caring for the earth.

In the ancient world, the Greeks and Romans looked upon manual work as a curse, something for lower classes and slaves. But Christianity changed all that. Christians viewed work as a high calling, a calling to be co-workers with God in unfolding the rich potential of His creation.

This high view of work can be traced throughout the history of the Church. In the Middle Ages, the guild movement grew out of the Church. It set standards for good workmanship and encouraged members to take satisfaction in the results of their labor. The guilds became the forerunner of the modern labor movement.

Later, during the Reformation, Martin Luther preached that all work should be done to the glory of God. Whether ministering the gospel or scrubbing floors, any honest work is pleasing to the Lord. And out of this conviction grew the Protestant work ethic.

Christians were also active on behalf of workers in the early days of the industrial revolution, when factories were “dark satanic mills,” to borrow a phrase from Sir William Blake. Work in factories and coal mines in those days was hard and dangerous. Children were practically slaves, sometimes even chained to the machines.

Then John Wesley came preaching and teaching the gospel throughout England. He came not to the upper classes, but to the laboring classes—to men whose faces were black with coal dust and women whose dresses were patched and faded.

John Wesley preached to them, and in the process, he pricked the conscience of the whole nation.

Two of Wesley’s disciples, William Wilberforce and Lord Shaftesbury, were inspired to work for legislation that would clean up abuses in the workplace. At their urging, the British parliament passed child-labor laws, safety laws, and minimum-wage laws.

Here in America we’ve lost the Christian connection with the labor movement. But in many countries that tradition still remains.

But this Labor Day, remember that all labor derives its true dignity as a reflection of the Creator. And that whatever we do, in word or deed, we should do all to the glory of God.

Eric: It’s always great to hear from Chuck. Now before I leave you today I want to ask you to please pray for the residents of Houston. And do what you can to support Christian organizations like Samaritan’s Purse that are providing aid and relief.

Let’s use this Labor Day to teach and reinforce biblical ideas of work.

Today is Labor Day. Although this day was set aside to honor trade and labor organizations, I believe it is a day when Christians can also consider how they view work and labor. The Bible has quite a bit to say about how we are to view work, and so I devote part of a chapter in my most recent book to a biblical view of work.

First, we are to work unto the Lord in our labors. Colossians 3:23 says, Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men. We may have a earthly master (or boss) but ultimately we are working for our heavenly Master.

Second, work is valuable. Paul says in 1 Thessalonians 4:11-12 to: Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life and attend to your own business and work with your hands, just as we commanded you, so that you will behave properly toward outsiders and not be in any need. He also warns in 2 Thessalonians 3:10 that if anyone is not willing to work, then he is not to eat, either.

The Proverbs talk about the importance and benefits of work. Proverbs 12:11 says: He who tills his land will have plenty of bread, But he who pursues worthless things lacks sense. Proverbs 13:4 says: The soul of the sluggard craves and gets nothing, But the soul of the diligent is made fat. And Proverbs 14:23 says: In all labor there is profit, But mere talk leads only to poverty.
( More )

Please pray for Houston, Tex

 

Please pray for Houston. For the Colson Center, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

The images coming from Houston, south Texas, and Louisiana are absolutely staggering. We must pray for them, that God would protect those in danger. That He would provide shelter, clothing, and food to all those in need. Pray for the police, firefighters, the National Guard, and all the volunteers. Pray for local and state and federal officials that are coordinating relief efforts.

And please pray for churches in Houston and the surrounding areas and states, that they’ll do what Christians throughout history have always done in the face of disaster—run into it, and not away from it.

Even now, let’s pray: God of compassion, You hear the cries of all those who are in trouble or distress; accept our prayers for those whose lives are affected by storms and flooding: strengthen them in their hour of need, grant them perseverance and courage to face the future and be to them a firm foundation on which to build their lives. This we ask through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.


 

 

Giving food, and water is not healthcare, but human-care

Listen to the commentary.