Category Archives: Jewish

A messianic Jewish leader calls it an outrage that a group of Christian leaders are defending the right to boycott Israel.

According to the Christian Post, a coalition of 17 liberal Christian groups sent a letter to Congress, urging lawmakers to reject a bill that would make it official U.S. policy to oppose boycotts of Israel.

The Israel Anti-Boycott Act would amend the Export Administration Act of 1979 to prohibit support of international state-sponsored boycotts of Israel by U.S. citizens engaged in interstate or international commerce.

 

Jan Markell, founder and director of Olive Tree Ministries, says the BDS movement, active now for several years, is attempting to hurt Israel economically.
“It’s an effort,” she says, “to hurt her image around the world.”

( Read the full story here. )

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The state of South Dakota has one lone Rabbi ( meet him )

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Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur

Today is the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. For Christians, it’s a reminder that repentance is more than an event. It’s a lifestyle.

Among the most striking images in Christianity is that of God the Judge, presiding in a courtroom where each of us will stand trial for everything we’ve done while in the body. For most Christians today, it’s an image of something far in the future—an eschatological moment following the resurrection and preceding the Marriage Supper of the Lamb.

That’s all true, of course. These are distinct, future events. We confess every time we recite the creed. But the reality of a coming judgment can sometimes obscure the fact that God is even now the Judge of all the earth, and we—guilty of offenses against Him—must seek and acknowledge His forgiveness regularly.

That’s an area where we could learn something from our Jewish friends, who recently marked Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, and who celebrate Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement—beginning this evening.

Writing at the Wall Street Journal, Orthodox rabbi and theologian Jonathan Sacks reflects on the meaning of these High Holy Days, which are rooted in the commands of Leviticus 23.

The ten days of repentance following Rosh Hashanah, explains Rabbi Sacks, are the “holy of holies” on the Jewish calendar. They open with a blast on the shofar—a ceremonial ram’s horn—announcing that God’s court is in session. Faithful Jews use this time to reflect how God judges each according to his or her life, and inscribes their fate in the Book of Life.

It all culminates on Yom Kippur, when the repentant recite alphabetical litanies of prayers, “throwing themselves on the mercy” of the Judge. Many Jews spend all day in services, refraining from work and pleasures until the shofar blows once more, marking the adjournment of God’s court. It’s a time of “cautious hope,” writes Rabbi Sacks. “We have admitted the worst about ourselves and survived.”

This concept of a merciful God who is our judge is the unique contribution of the Hebrews—a transition in history “from fate to faith.” For ancient polytheists, the gods were cruel and capricious, often more interested in making mortals suffer than in forgiving them. The best one could hope for was to appease the fickle deities.

The God of the Jews, however, was different. Not only did He readily forgive His worshipers for their offense, but He was actively fighting for them. He loved them, because they were each created in His image, bearing moral responsibility and freedom like His own. More important still, the Israelites were his covenant people.

This unique idea of a righteous, forgiving God also changed the way the people of Israel thought about their own moral standing. Unlike the pagans, who saw their problems as primarily external, or “out there” in nature or with their enemies, Jews came to understand mankind’s problems are chiefly internal, or “in here” because of their moral guilt.

“The key fact about us, according to the Bible,” write Sacks, “is that uniquely in an otherwise law-governed universe, we are able to break the law—a power that we too often relish exercising.”

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are beautiful reminders that God forgives those who repent of their sins.

But Christians believe that the ultimate picture of God’s forgiveness is found in the Person of Jesus Christ, who is both the agent and the means of God’s mercy—the Priest and the sacrificial Lamb. Christ atoned for our sins not simply by dismissing them, but by taking them on Himself along with their due penalty.

His work is once for all, the just for the unjust, and He calls us as His followers intentionally and regularly to remember that the Judge forgives, and that we ought turn from our sins in regular repentance, especially when we gather around the communion table.

 

God’s court is in session, the Book of Life is open, and so let’s throw ourselves on the mercy of the Judge who has entrusted all judgement to Jesus, who sacrificed Himself once for all (Heb 7:27).

Gravedigger who died on the job was considered part of Jewish community even though he wasn’t

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Submitting ( Thought on the Bible )

Listen to A thought on the Bible or read it below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What should be the Christian attitude to authorities in our lives.
Hi: I’m Billy David Dickson with a thought on the Bible.
It tells us in Romans chapter 13, check it out, all authority has been established by the Lord. It doesn’t matter if the leader is a parent, a teacher, your pastor, or a government leader.
So how should we respond to our leaders.
First off we are to respect them. If we don’t honor our leaders we are really showing disrespect to God. Because God is the one which has given them power.Those folks who don’t honor Donald Trump as President, or did not honor Barack Obama as President are really not honoring the Lord. Now it is ok to disagree with a leader, but we must do it in respectful way.
Then we should pray for our leaders. It doesn’t matter if you voted for a leader, or not.
There might come a time when we have to disobey a leader. Just like Peter when he was told not to preach Jesus, he said, “we must obey God rather than man.” If by obeying a leader we would be disobeying the law of God we must submit to the Lord. Now we should not just not disobey a leader, or a law because we don’t agree with him, or it. They must be in conflict with God. There is also a difference between something being allowed, and you being forced to do something. In Germany when Hitler was in power every follower of Jesus should have disobeyed him, and helped the Jewish citizens of that nation. We may even have to not follow the teaching of a spiritual leader. Awhile back the leader of a church said Jewish people don’t need Jesus. Every true believer in that church should keep sharing Christ with others including with Jewish folks.The Bible makes it clear there is salvation in no other name, but Jesus Christ.
That is a thought on the Bible.
Until next time,
I’m Billy David Dickson

All Rights Reserved, 2017
This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read more commentary on https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/.

Margaret Bergmann Lambert, Jewish Athlete Excluded From Berlin Olympics, Dies at 103

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Frankly, rabbi, we don’t care what your opinion is about the health care program.

I have known David Wolpe for close to 30 years. I have never discussed politics with him. I have always tried to pry information about Judaism from him because he has written more than a few books on the subject. Other than that, we have discussed family. I have no idea what his political beliefs are, nor do I care. I do know he was in a meeting of Jewish rabbis and religious teachers I helped to arrange with President George W. Bush, and he was favorably impressed with Bush’s earnest commitment to Israel, as were others in the room. But on the rare occasion I get to see him these days, I would never discuss politics. I am in no way surprised my friend wrote such a column; he is a very wise man.

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Jewish Christmas

Jesus the Jew

Hero Who Saved 669 Children During The Holocaust Has No Idea He’s Surrounded By Them On TV Show

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The Pope is wrong on Muslim terrorism 

Whenever the Pope speaks, it is worth considering what he says whether you are a Catholic or not. His worldview influence is considerable, and so we should pay attention to his words.
That is why I am concerned about his recent address on Muslim terrorism. He argued that: “Christian terrorism does not exist, Jewish terrorism does not exist, and Muslim terrorism does not exist.” If his point was to say that not all Christians and not all Muslims are terrorists, that is obvious. It is a self-evident fact.
He also seemed to be arguing that terrorism is the result of economic inequalities rather than religious beliefs. Not only is that not true, it would come as a surprise to some of the rich, well-educated radical Muslim leaders and to some of the oil-rich regions that have been state sponsors of terrorism.

( Muslim Terrorism )