Category Archives: healthcare

House pro-lifers warn Senate: Don’t fund PP

Read the story.

Dale Chihuly discusses struggles with mental health

The private studio of glass artist Dale Chihuly reflects his long obsession with collecting. Sheets of stamps cover one table; pocket knives are marshaled on another. Carnival-prize figurines from the first half of the 20th century line shelves that reach the ceiling.

Amid the ordered clutter, some items hint at more than Chihuly’s eclectic tastes: a long row of Ernest Hemingway titles in one bookcase, and in another an entire wall devoted to Vincent van Gogh — homages to creative geniuses racked by depression.

 

Chihuly, too, has struggled with his mental health, by turns fragile and luminous like the art he makes. Now 75 and still in the thrall of a decades-long career, he discussed his bipolar disorder in detail for the first time publicly in an interview with The Associated Press.

He and his wife, Leslie Chihuly, said they don’t want to omit from his legacy a large part of who he is, but they were also motivated to speak in part by a $21 million demand letter they had received from a former contractor who claimed to have contributed to Chihuly’s art.
( More )

 

 

10 year old sees colors for the first time

Read a cool story
with pictures.

A lady who defends FGM

This lady has a crazy view that is out to lunch. How can one defend an evil act done to little girls. This is sad, and sick.

There is no health benefit to FGM. Unlike the act done to little boys which this lady wants to support. She is out to lunch.

Watch the video
to see if you agree with me.

Congress Passes Bill To Repeal And Replace Obamacare

It is a start. Read the story.

Prince Harry talks about his battle with depression

Harry has opened up about his struggles after his Princess Diana’s death in a revealing new interview that breaks with royal tradition of staying silent about personal issues.
( Read the rest of this Story.)

bill that would strip parents of rights ,fails ( believe it, or not it happen in a state out in left field, CO.)

Here is the story.

Kansas gives parents more control over their children’s healthcare ( good for them ) 

Kansas is taking steps to give parents more control over medical decisions about life-extending care for their disabled or critically ill children with a new law that supporters hope becomes a model for other states.
Republican Gov. Sam Brownback signed a bill Friday that will prevent hospitals and physicians from instituting do-not-resuscitate orders or similar directives for children if one parent objects. The new law takes effect July 1.

( Read the rest of this story. )

Colton Meridith a third grader who is thriving with Autism: 

April 2nd is World Autism Awareness Day. Colton Meridith was first diagnosed at age three. He put in an amazing amount of work, and because of that, he is thriving.

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” asked WOWT’s Malorie Maddox.
Colton: “A doctor” 

Malorie: “A doctor? Why?!”

Colton: “Because my mom wants me to and I want to take care of other people.”
He’s only in 3rd grade, but Colton Meridith has a memory most adults would give anything for. Just ask him about movies.

( Read the rest of this story, and watch the video of it in which you can see the young handsome Colton by going here.)

The gay lifestyle is risking

( Below is the Breakpoint radio commentary for today. ) 
consequences, and bad ideas have victims. False promises of love and personal fulfillment are no exception.
Over a year and-a-half after the Obergefell decision, the debate over gay “marriage” and homosexuality has largely fizzled out: partly because of the election, partly because the “T” in the LGBT acronym has been stealing all the headlines, and partly because Obergefell is now viewed by many as settled law. And that’s a shame, because so-called “progress” isn’t bringing about the rosy picture we were promised.
In what may be the most candid piece in Huffington Post history, Michael Hobbes, who identifies as gay, writes about what he calls an “epidemic of loneliness.”
“For years,” he begins, “I’ve noticed the divergence between my straight friends and my gay friends. While one half of my social circle has disappeared into relationships, kids and suburbs, the other has struggled through isolation and anxiety, hard drugs and risky (behavior).”
Through story after story and mountains of statistics, Hobbes then documents a consistent and chilling trend among those who share his lifestyle. “Gay men everywhere, at every age,” he writes, are two-to-ten-times more likely than heterosexual men to commit suicide.
And that’s just the beginning. Homosexual males also suffer from higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, allergies, asthma, and a whole host of behavior-related infections and dysfunctions. They’re twice as likely to experience major depressive episodes, report having fewer close friends, and abuse drugs at an alarming rate.
In fact, living in so-called “gay neighborhoods” is a predictor of more frequent, risky behaviors and methamphetamine use. And, Hobbes adds, the community itself is brutal and degrading to its members. Smart-phone hookup apps drive a culture of exploitation and casual encounters that one young man he interviewed said made him feel like “a piece of meat.”
We often hear these disastrous statistics and stories attributed to homophobia, bullying, and shame. Having been treated horribly since childhood, men like this author—the oft-repeated myth goes—are forced to live a lie. They’re depressed because they’ve been oppressed and repressed.
But here’s the problem with the bullying hypothesis. In countries like the Netherlands and Sweden where same-sex “marriage” has been the law of the land for years, gay men remain three times more susceptible to mood disorders and three- to ten-times more likely to engage in “suicidal self-harm.”
The situation is so bad that one respondent in a survey of HIV clinics told researchers, “It’s not a question of not knowing how to save their lives. It’s a question of them not knowing if their lives are worth saving.”
Incredibly, after this long and brutal and well-documented description of life in his community, Hobbes then concludes the cause as having minority status, which has taught them to live in fear. At no point does he consider the possibility that it’s the lifestyle itself that may be what’s destroying these men’s lives.
Still, one expert quoted in the piece hints that he knows what’s going on. Christopher Stults, a researcher at New York University, admits that for many people, the marriage decision was a letdown. “We have this legal status, and yet there’s still something unfulfilled.”
Could it be that this lifestyle cuts off this community from the natural family, from children, and—according to years of statistics—from monogamous partnerships? Could it be the disparity Hobbes sees between what he wants and what he got is a result of a broken lifestyle? Could it be that this behavior naturally isolates people? Could it be that God didn’t design His image-bearers to live like this, and when we do, it actually destroys us?
Unfortunately, those questions are no longer even considered by Hobbes or by social scientists. But we as a society, and especially the Church, must consider these questions. As long as there are real people trying to fill their hearts with lies, caring about them will mean having a more open mind than the Huffington Post.