Category Archives: Values issue

Right focus during a sad event

Have you ever gone through something that shook you to your core? My friend, Monty Williams, the well-respected Oklahoma City Thunder Assistant Basketball Coach, experienced a tragedy. His wife died in a tragic car accident in 2016.

During the memorial service, Monty surprised those in attendance with his response to his wife’s death. He said, “I love you guys for taking time out of your day to celebrate my wife.  But I didn’t lose her. When you lose something you don’t know where it is. I know exactly where my wife is. I’ll miss holding her hand. I’ll miss talking with my wife…but she is in Heaven.” 

Wow! When I heard his speech, I got tears in my eyes. Despite losing his spouse, Monty – a very committed Bible believer – let his faith be his guide. And in doing so, he showed the thousands of people who watched his televised speech what an unshakable faith really is. Maybe you’re experiencing a tragedy in your own life. Maybe you lost a loved one, or experienced a serious illness or injury. In any case, you have two choices. You can give in to the anger and sadness that usually accompany those events, or you can keep your eyes fixed on Jesus, His promises and presence. 

Acts 2:25 in the Bible says, “‘I saw the Lord always before me. Because he is at my right hand, I will not be shaken.” Keep your heart focused on Jesus. And regardless of what comes your way, you will not be shaken. 

 

This is Luis Palau

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The Point: The Boy Scouts Are Lost

In a world without paths, everyone is lost. For the Colson Center, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

The Boy Scouts recently announced they’ll welcome girls. It was an inevitable move given other recent decisions; but I’ve heard from countless scouts, both young and old, that this represents a kind of death for their beloved organization.

Now let me be clear—the problem is not girls in scouting. The problem is that boys no longer have many places left to be boys. As Trevin Wax put it at The Gospel Coalition, boys are running out of paths toward manhood—something the Boy Scouts long provided.

Our culture right now is obsessed with obliterating both distinct paths and distinct roles, demanding everyone be the same, even though they’re not. Though the rallying cry is diversity, in reality we’re committed to monotony—no boys, no girls, no husbands, no wives, no men, no women, no right, no wrong—just undifferentiated “persons” expressing individuality that, ironically, all starts to look the same.

 

The Boy Scouts aren’t the only casualty of this revolution, but they are one worth mourning.

Trump’s timely evangelical appeal

There hasn’t been a time more important in recent history to clearly support traditional Christian values and unabashed American patriotism – and President Trump is stepping up. That’s why his relationship with evangelicals is growing stronger.

President Trump addressed this year’s annual Values Voters Summit in Washington, DC. He is the first sitting U.S. president to do so. (See related story)

The Values Voters Summit is hosted by the Family Research Council, an organization whose mission is addressing public policy and culture from a Christian point of view. My organization CURE works closely with FRC and I have been a regular speaker at this Summit for years.

Its base is largely evangelical Christians, and this is why President Trump deemed it appropriate to appear.

Eighty-one percent of white evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016, the highest percentage of evangelical support for any Republican in the last four presidential elections.

 

According to the Pew Research Center, 36 percent of the electorate self-identifies as evangelical Christian, so it’s indicative of Trump’s strong political instincts that he has gone out to actively engage this important and significant base of support.

( Read the rest  of this column by Star Parker. )

Who is Jesus to you

 

 
03:55
 

Who is Jesus? It’s a foundational question, and one many Christians struggle to answer.

In Matthew 16, Jesus asks His disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?”

“Some say John the Baptist,” they replied, “others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”

“But who do you say that I am?”

These days, increasingly odd and just plain wrong answers to Jesus’ question seem to be floating around everywhere, and churches are one of the easiest places to find them. This shouldn’t surprise us, however. As we’ve said before on BreakPoint, beliefs come in bunches. So when you see increasingly unorthodox and innovative ideas about sex, marriage, and the human person coming from religious leaders, you can bet they’re also entertaining increasingly unorthodox and innovative ideas about truth, the Bible, and even God Himself.

For example, Dr. Karen Oliveto, the first openly lesbian bishop in the United Methodist Church, recently offered this message to her flock:

“Too many folks want to box Jesus in,” she wrote, “carve him in stone, create an idol out of him. [But] the wonderful counselor, mighty God, everlasting one, prince of peace, was as human as you and me. Like you and me, he didn’t have his life figured out.” Jesus had “bigotries and prejudices,” she added, even sins which He had to learn to overcome.

Wait, Jesus can be an “idol”? As John Lomperis with the Institute on Religion and Democracy remarked, “[A]n idol is something other than God, usually something created by human hands, improperly worshipped as a god.” But Jesus is God. For Dr. Oliveto to suggest that it’s improper to worship God is like suggesting it’s improper to love your spouse.

And a Jesus who sinned wouldn’t have been God, nor worthy of our worship. Ironically, this bishop’s imaginary Jesus would be the idol—along with the Jesus of the Arian and Unitarian heresies, which teach that Jesus was a good man but a created being, not God in human flesh.

But before we give Dr. Oliveto too much grief, we ought to ask where our own theology is.

A 2014 LifeWay Research survey of self-described evangelicals found that while nearly all profess belief in the Trinity, one in four say God the Father is “more divine” than Jesus. That’s similar to what the Arians believed, it’s the error the Nicene Creed was written to combat.

In another survey conducted last year, LifeWay talked only with those who held core evangelical and conservative beliefs. Yet an astonishing seven in ten said Jesus was the first being created by God—again, a defining feature of Arianism. And more than a quarter held that the Holy Spirit is not equal with either the Father or the Son.

This sad mess shouldn’t just bother theological eggheads. These errors strike at the heart of Christianity, giving fundamentally unscriptural answers to the question, “Who is Jesus?”

Answering this question correctly is itself an act of worship. It’s a vital part of knowing and loving our God as He is. And it impacts Christians’ lives at the most basic level.

For example, because Jesus is equal with the Father and fully God means He can truly pardon us. As the scribes in Mark 2 correctly observed, “Only God can forgive sins.”

Yet Jesus is also fully human. In order to serve as our High Priest, He became like us in every respect, as Hebrews 2:17 says. In order to redeem Adam’s race, the Last Adam had to belong to it.

This God-Man was not only sinless, He is entirely worthy of our worship. In reply to His question, “Who do you say that I am?” We should be able to say with Peter, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,” and with Thomas, who fell on His knees before the risen Jesus and said, “My Lord and my God.”

Please come visit us at BreakPoint.org.We’ll link you to books and other resources that will help you and your family walk through these essential truths and answer the fundamental questions of the Christian worldview

A death row inmate changed, and like him we all have a need

Listen to a commentary.

BreakPoint: Chuck Colson’s Conversion One Night in a Driveway

Listen to the commentary or read it below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today is Chuck Colson’s birthday. To hear Chuck talk about his “born-again” day, stay tuned to BreakPoint.

Today, October 16, is the anniversary of Chuck Colson’s birth. He would have been 86 years old.

Most of you know about his life, how God used President Nixon’s former “hatchet man” to take the Good News of Jesus to prisoners around the globe, and become one of the great Christian leaders of the past hundred years.

But today, I want you to hear Chuck tell how his life changed forever—one night in a driveway. Here’s Chuck.

Thirty years ago today, I visited Tom Phillips, president of the Raytheon Company, at his home outside of Boston. I’d represented Raytheon before going to the White House, and I was about to start again.

But I visited for another reason as well. I knew Tom had become a Christian, and he seemed so different. I wanted to ask him what had happened.

That night he read to me from Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis, particularly a chapter about the great sin that is pride. A proud man is always walking through life looking down on other people and other things, said Lewis. As a result, he cannot see something above himself immeasurably superior—God.

Tom, that night, told me about encountering Christ in his own life. He didn’t realize it, but I was in the depths of deep despair over Watergate, watching the president I had helped for four years flounder in office. I’d also heard that I might become a target of the investigation as well. In short, my world was collapsing.

That night, as Tom was telling me about Jesus, I listened attentively, but didn’t let on my own need. When he offered to pray, I thanked him but said, no, I’d see him sometime after I read C. S. Lewis’s book. But when I got in the car that night, I couldn’t drive it out of the driveway. Ex-Marine captain, White House tough guy, I was crying too hard, calling out to God. I didn’t know what to say; I just knew I needed Jesus, and He came into my life.

That was thirty years ago.

I’ve been reflecting of late on the things God has done over that time. As I think about my life, the beginning of the prison ministry, our work in the justice area, our international ministry that reaches a hundred countries, and the work of the Wilberforce Forum and BreakPoint, I have come to appreciate the doctrine of providence. It’s not the world’s idea of fate or luck, but the reality of God’s divine intervention. He orchestrates the lives of His children to accomplish His good purposes.

God has certainly ordered my steps. I couldn’t have imagined when I was in prison that I would someday be going back to the White House with ex-offenders as I did on June 18; or that we’d be running prisons that have an 8 percent recidivism rate; or that BreakPoint would be daily heard on a thousand outlets across the United States and on the Internet.

The truth that is uppermost in my mind today is that God isn’t finished. As long as we’re alive, He’s at work in our lives. We can live lives of obedience in any field because God providentially arranges the circumstances of our lives to achieve His objectives.

And that leads to the greatest joy I’ve found in life. As I look back on my life, it’s not having been to Buckingham Palace to receive the Templeton Prize, or getting honorary degrees, or writing books. The greatest joy is to see how God has used my life to touch the lives of others, people hurting and in need.

It’s been a long time since the dark days of Watergate. I’m still astounded that God would take someone who was infamous in the Watergate scandal, soon to be a convicted felon, and take him into His family and then order his steps in the way He has with me. God touched me at that moment in Tom Phillip’s driveway, and thirty years later, His love and kindness touch and astound me still.

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania Republican Congressman Tim Murphy and the soul of America

The United States recently witnessed a tragic example of hypocrisy in high office on the question of the s anctity of human life.   Pennsylvania Republican Congressman Tim Murphy has a voting pattern of defending the sanctity of human life and only lately was amongst those who voted to ban abortion after 20…

( Read, or listen to the commentary here. )

What is the # 1 Problem in America ?

Listen to A Thought on the Bible, here or read it below.

 

 

 

 

 

What is the number 1 problem in America, or what is one of the top ills in this nation. 

Hi: I’m Billy David Dickson with A thought on the Bible.

   So what would you say is one of the top things wrong in this great nation today.

    Drugs: No doubt drug abuse is a problem for too many souls. It has broken up families, and destroyed too many lives.

   Abortion: No debate the taking of human life has made all  life cheap. It is sad that abortion on demand remains the law of the land in our nation.

     God, and traditional values being removed from our nation: Yes, it is sad that in much of our  culture God, along with Jesus, and the Bible has become a four letter word. In the schools kids are taught they came from apes, and that any kind of sexual relations is ok.Too many schools have removed the Ten Commandments. One of them by the way is do not murder, and today we have young people being murdered in the schools. No wonder.

       I believe these issues  however are just fruits of our biggest problem today. 

           John 17:3 reads..

“This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent.”

    The biggest ill here in the good old USA, and in many other nations is too many souls don’t know Jesus Christ. Yes, souls may go to church, but going to a church doesn’t make you a follower of Christ, anymore than going to Burger King makes you a whopper. 

   To be a true follower of the Lord Jesus here is what one must do..

 Admit  they have sinned against a Holy God. 

Accept that Christ took their punishment. 

And receive Christ.

 If you don’t know if you have ever done that my guess is you haven’t done it, so why not do it today.                                                                                                                                That is a thought on the Bible.                                                                                           

  Until next time,                                                                                                                    

   I’m Billy David Dickson                                                                                                            All Rights Reserved, 2017 

 

This blog may be reproduced in whole or in part with a full attribution statement. Contact Billy or read  more commentary on  https://billydteacher.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

 

sin is not exclusive to one party or political persuasion. ( from Cal Thomas )

“Where there is no revelation, people cast off restraint; but blessed is the one who heeds wisdom’s instruction.” (Proverbs 29:18)

Ancient wisdom from a Higher Authority, which is available to anyone who takes the time to consider it, was provided to constrain people like Harvey Weinstein from acts he has been accused of committing.

In an age when we have cast off most restraints — from restrictions on abortion, to sanctioning same-sex marriage, to normalizing the use of nudity, crude language and sex in Hollywood films, not to mention wisdom — why is anything off limits? Who decides where the limits are these days? And on what do they base their decision?

Haven’t some federal judges been eviscerating the U.S. Constitution for decades? Haven’t even some clergy made attempts to rewrite or ignore Scripture to conform to opinion polls and align themselves with contemporary trends?

 

Many Republicans and conservatives are joyfully berating and belittling Harvey Weinstein and his fellow leftists, but they should remind themselves that sin is not exclusive to one party or political persuasion. Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA) resigned his office last week after the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette obtained text messages between Murphy and his mistress in which he told her to have an abortion if she thought she might be pregnant. Murphy, who claims to be “pro-life,” co-sponsored a bill that would ban abortion after 20 weeks.

( Billy’s thoughts – Read the rest of this spot-on column from Cal Thomas. ) 

BreakPoint: The Catastrophic Vision of Hugh Hefner

The man who embodied the sexual revolution has died. We’ll talk about the consequences—and victims—of his vision.

Back on September 27th, Hugh Hefner the founder of Playboy, died at ninety-one.

An ancient Roman maxim says that one shouldn’t speak ill of the dead, but it would be irresponsible to not take note of his ideas and cultural influence, along with their consequences and victims.

Much of the coverage of his death has been admiring or even adulatory. The New York Times’ obituary, while mentioning Hefner’s feminist critics mostly in passing, emphasized how successful and influential he’d been. There’s been a lot of “he changed the game,” “he lived on his own terms,” and “he lived life to the fullest” sort of language about him.

CNN said that while “Some critics dismissed him as a relic of a sexist era, especially in his later years . . . many men envied his adolescent-fantasy lifestyle.” The Washington Postcalled Hefner’s legacy “complicated” and then proceeded to quote gushing tribute after gushing tribute. This sort of adulation for a man best-known for wearing his pajamas all day and spending nights with women young enough to be his granddaughter should embarrass even the media.

Eleven years ago, Chuck Colson put Hefner’s legacy into proper perspective. On the occasion of Heffner’s 80th birthday, Chuck said that “Hugh Hefner did more than anyone else to turn America into a great pornographic wasteland.”

Hefner’s journalistic eulogists are celebrating his rebellion and ultimate triumph over the “puritanical elements of the [1950s].” You know, that “dark and joyless time in America,” as writer Matthew Scully put it, “when one could actually go about daily life without ever encountering pornographic images.” Without Hefner’s pioneering vision, “American males could not avail themselves of hundreds of millions of obscene films every year—as they do now.”

That our pornographic wasteland is filled with so many victims is also part of the man’s legacy, which can only be fully understood in light of the larger story of the sexual revolution.

You see, Hefner once claimed to have changed America, and it’s hard to argue that he didn’t. He took Alfred Kinsey’s ideas of sex separated from morality and embodied them in images and words, making them seem glamorous, sophisticated, and respectable.

Along with the birth control pill, porn was the other tangible artifact of the sexual revolution and catalyzed the separation of the sexual act from its God-given purpose. Instead of a self-giving, life-giving act in the context of marriage like God intended, sex became an act of selfish pleasure in the cultural imagination.

Porn turned image bearers into objects to be enjoyed instead of subjects to be respected and honored, while giving the illusion that there were no consequences or guilt. Hefner was what I call “the artist” of the sexual revolution, granted a loosely-used modifier here. Ideas alone can’t change culture; they need champions, and the most effective champions are artists and educators.

The problem, as my BreakPoint This Week co-host Ed Stetzer often says, is that no one even won the sexual revolution, but everybody lost. Ideas have consequences and bad ideas have victims.

Hefner’s legacy includes fatherless homes, objectified women, porn-addicted and trafficked children, and the sexualization of all aspects of culture. And in a supreme bit of irony, a decreased interest in sex with real-life women by addicted men.

All of this is the result of what Hefner called the “Playboy Philosophy”: ultimately the divorcing of sex from its God-given context—marriage—and its God-given consequences—children.

 

I posted about Hefner’s legacy on Facebook soon after his death, and one commenter quoted Jesus, “For what will it profit a man to gain the whole world but lose his soul?” And thanks in large part to Hugh Hefner, the same might be asked about our entire culture.