Five years ago today Chuck Colson a changed man died 

Eric Metaxas: It is impossible for me to overstate the influence Chuck Colson had on my life and on the lives of millions: from the prisoners he visited to the listeners of this radio program. And I miss him so badly. So today, on the fifth anniversary of his death, I’d like you to hear the story of Chuck’s birth: That is, his re-birth in Jesus Christ. And I’d like you to hear it from him.
Here’s Chuck, talking about the thirtieth anniversary of his conversion.
Thirty years ago today, I visited Tom Phillips, president of the Raytheon Company, at his home outside of Boston. I had represented Raytheon before going to the White House, and I was about to start again.
But I visited him for another reason as well. I knew Tom had become a Christian, and he seemed so different. I wanted to ask him what had happened.
That night he read to me from Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis, particularly a chapter about the great sin that is pride. A proud man is always walking through life looking down on other people and other things, said Lewis. As a result, he cannot see something above himself immeasurably superior — God.
Tom, that night, told me about encountering Christ in his own life. He didn’t realize it, but I was in the depths of deep despair over Watergate, watching the president I had helped for four years flounder in office. I had also heard that I might become a target of the investigation as well. In short, my world was collapsing.
That night, as Tom was telling me about Jesus, I listened attentively, but didn’t let on about my need. When he offered to pray, I thanked him but said, no, I would see him sometime after I had read C. S. Lewis’s book. But when I got in the car that night, I couldn’t drive it out of the driveway. Ex-Marine captain, White House tough guy, I was crying too hard, calling out to God. I didn’t know what to say; I just knew I needed Jesus, and He came into my life.
That was thirty years ago.
I’ve been reflecting of late on the things God has done over that time. As I think about my life, the beginning of the prison ministry, our work in the justice area, our international ministry that reaches one hundred countries, and the work of the Wilberforce Forum and BreakPoint, I have come to appreciate the doctrine of providence. It’s not the world’s idea of fate or luck, but the reality of God’s divine intervention. He orchestrates the lives of His children to accomplish His good purposes.
God has certainly ordered my steps. I couldn’t have imagined when I was in prison that I would someday go back to the White House with ex-offenders as I did on June 18 — or that we would be running prisons that have an 8 percent recidivism rate — or that BreakPoint would be heard daily on one thousand radio outlets across the United States and on the Internet.
The truth that is uppermost in my mind today is that God isn’t finished. As long as we’re alive, He’s at work in our lives. We can live lives of obedience in any field because God providentially arranges the circumstances of our lives to achieve His objectives.
And that leads to the greatest joy I’ve found in life. As I look back on my life, it’s not having been to Buckingham Palace to receive the Templeton Prize, or getting honorary degrees, or writing books. The greatest joy is to see how God has used my life to touch the lives of others, people hurting and in need.
It has been a long time since the dark days of Watergate. I’m still astounded that God would take someone who was infamous in the Watergate scandal, and soon to be a convicted felon, and take him into His family and then order his steps in the way He has with me. God touched me at that moment in Tom Phillip’s driveway, and thirty years later, His love and kindness touch and astound me still.

Bill O’Reilly’s firing teachable moment for the conservative movement,and Christians 

First, we should demand character, not merely competence, from our political leaders and cultural spokesmen. Those who oppose conservative and Christian ideas will seize any opportunity to discredit the message by attacking the messenger. We should be careful about whom we look to as spokespeople.
Secondly, let’s remember that “conservative” does not always equal “Christian.” We live in an era in which the culture is trending away from Christian ideas and toward secularism. So conserving what came before often—not always, but often—means conserving Christian ideas. But when and where that is not the case, we should be careful to promote Christian ideals and not merely conservative ideology.
Thirdly, we should remember that the ends do not justify the means. The Christian worldview is true, but it is not merely true. It is also good and beautiful. If we resort to the ugly, the evil, and the banal in our public discourse and private lives, we undermine the truth of the story we want the world to hear.
Finally, let’s not depend so much on our media stars to do the heavy lifting of cultural change. Here at the Colson Center we talk often about “de-professionalizing” the work of the Gospel, including the work of cultural change. By that we mean that raising our kids means more than just sending them to the right youth group. And cultural engagement means more than following a media celebrity on Facebook or retweeting a clever meme.
I often speak to young people who are burning with enthusiasm to “make a difference” in the world. My counsel to them is usually “If you want to change the world, first make your bed.” We should remember that the best evidence for the transformative power of the Gospel is the testimony of our own transformed lives. Christians should live differently if we want our ideas to have credibility in the public square.
To conclude: I cannot say with certainty whether Bill O’Reilly is guilty or innocent of the sexual harassment charges, but the evidence we do have, and his spectacular fall from public favor, should lead to a teachable moment for the conservative movement and Christians in particular. We should take a good, long, hard look in the cultural mirror and remember Shakespeare’s words: “The fault . . . is not in our [media] stars, but in ourselves.”

( A TEACHABLE MOMENT FOR THE CONSERVATIVE MOVEMENT )
( Billy’s thoughts – The only thing I would add to the above piece is join me in a prayer I praying for Bill, his firing would draw him to Christ. That happened to a well known column writer years ago after he was fired by NBC TV. Today he is on fire for Christ, and making a difference in the media for Jesus. The same could happen in Bill’s life. )

LGBTQ, transgender issues should be taught in nursery school, UK teachers’ union says

The story is here. By the way if you live in the UK, you might want to give hard thinking to removing your children from the government schools, along with the public nursery schools.

    The rest of us should do what we can to reach young people with the truth, or support those who do. Thank God for Christian ministries that are touching young people with the good news, such as CEF, and Youth for Christ.

bill that would strip parents of rights ,fails ( believe it, or not it happen in a state out in left field, CO.)

Here is the story.

The O’Reilly Factor 1996-2017

Read a column about the end of Bill at Fox News.

Thinking of this little girl who just lost her daddy 

FGM needs to stop ASAP,and where are the women right’s groups (it is sick )

Video

Believe it, or not United tried to remove another ticket holder from one of their planes, this time it was.

Martin Luther boldly confronted the unbiblical idea of indulgences

Martin Luther fought an uphill battle to bring the Bible back as the prime rule of faith and life in the church of his day. His efforts brought about the Reformation. He boldly confronted the unbiblical idea of indulgences, by which money would release a soul from purgatory.

Listen to a 15 minute Sermon.

The debate on the doctrine of grace, and Luther ( view of a Catholic, and the view of a Protestant ) 

( Read the two pieces below, and check them out with Bible to see who you agree with. A church can be wrong, or a spiritual leader can be wrong, but God,and his book the Bible are never wrong. )

Grace Alone’ 500 Years Later A Catholic perspective.
Grace Alone’: Luther Nails It A Protestant responds to Catholic critiques of ‘Grace Alone.’